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A list of HDC’s upcoming events as well as our annual programs, and breaking preservation news.

 

Events:

HDC is always busy, view our Past Events page to see what other evens we’ve held.

Programs:

 

News:

Re:Neighborhood Values: NY Post, July 5, 2014

Demolition freeze may cover 80% of the city: Crains, April 14, 2014

The Historic Districts Council says the city’s historic districts are not to blame for the shortage of affordable housing: Daily News, February 26, 2014

Landlords take aim at rampant landmarking: Crains New York,July 11, 2013

Landmark advocates recall Alamo-like efforts: Chelsea Now, November 3, 2012

New York Landmark Status Misused, Says Group Preservationists say New York’s history under attack:Epoch Times, June 21, 2012

Preservationists Issue Rallying Cry, Prepare to Save Landmarks Law from Big Real Estate: New York Observer, June 14th, 2012

Defending Historic Preservation in New York City

PS 31 - The Castle

The since-demolished P.S. 31, “The Castle of the Grand Concourse”

Historic preservation as both a strategy and as a philosophy is under attack as never before.

Although community advocates have achieved some big successes in recent years by gaining long-sought landmark designations and thwarting (or at least modifying) destructive proposals to historic buildings, the Real Estate Board of New York (“REBNY”), the principal lobbyist for organized real estate, has been relentless in its campaign to undermine the Landmarks Law and all community preservation efforts.

Emboldened by years of record growth, REBNY is accusing preservation efforts of driving up housing costs, endangering affordable housing, stopping job creation and economic growth, protecting worthless buildings and penalizing home and business owners with costly fees and delays. REBNY even pursued a serious lobbying effort to transform and weaken the Landmarks Law through a series of bills which would transform how the Landmarks Preservation Commission designates and regulates historic properties. To hear them tell it, landmark designation transforms New York into a lifeless museum city with a “look but don’t touch” mentality.

The Historic Districts Council (“HDC”) feels that nothing could be further from the truth. Preservation practices empower communities, celebrate our history, drive economic growth and sustain development efforts. Preservation enhances our streetscapes, nurtures tourism, encourages investment and employs local labor. It is a popular, populist movement driven by regular New Yorkers who value their homes and their city.

HDC works with community groups throughout the five boroughs on efforts to save, preserve and enhance the special character of New York’s historic neighborhoods. We work with communities from areas as different as the Upper West Side and Bedford-Stuyvesant on the shared goal of empowering the community to have a voice in determining their own future. These two communities are ones whose efforts we honored at the Grassroots Preservation Awards and whose successes have been targeted as “over-reaching” by the real estate lobby.

The threat to preservation laws and historic buildings is still very real. HDC will continue counter arguing REBNY as long as they continue to release studies based on lies  and misconceptions. Through HDC’s mobilization and education we have been able to keep the preservation community strong, but we will never be as loud as REBNY. We need all the support of our neighborhood partners, history lovers, and lovers of New York.

Additional Resources:

Preservation and Job Creation

Press

 

  • Articles and Media Coverage: Preservation and the Battle to Preserve It

 

 

 HDC continues to vigilantly defend New York City’s Landmarks Law and promotes efforts to strengthen protections for historic buildings. This section will be updated regularly with current events regarding this issue.

2017 Grassroots Preservation Awards

The 2017 Grassroots Preservation Awards : Tue., May 2nd,  at Saint Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery

Every year, the Historic Districts Council celebrates New York’s brightest community preservationists with our Annual Grassroots Preservation Awards. The party will take place on Tuesday, May 2nd, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at Saint Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery, 131 E 10th St, New York, NY 10003 and we hope you’ll join us.

Please consider becoming a Co-Sponsor and help celebrate our awardees for their dedication to preserving New York City’s fantastic neighborhoods. This year’s Grassroots Awards recipients work on the ground, in public service and online to bring attention and resources to saving the heart and soul of New York City. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HDC Testimony for LPC Hearing on April 25, 2017

Posted by on Monday, April 24, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

Item 1

230 Grosvenor Street – Douglaston Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #198265

A Tudor Revival style house designed by Walter I. Halliday and built in 1927. Application is to modify window and door openings and replace windows.

While HDC is comfortable with the changes in the fenestration, we are confused about the proposed doors. The applicant’s presentation is unclear about the presence of the building’s historic door, and our committee would like to know whether or not it is currently extant,  as it is called out in the designation report as being a historic feature. Regarding the proposed storm door, we find an aluminum Anderson 3000 door to be inappropriate for a house of this age. 


Item 2

276 Hicks Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #197411

A carriage house built in 1903. Application is to construct rooftop and rear yard additions, and replace a door.

276 Hicks is one of a few charming carriage houses remaining in historic Brooklyn Heights. Its historic alteration of a skylight extension contributes to its layered history and HDC recommends retaining this feature, not removing it. 


Item 3

435 Clinton Avenue – Clinton Hill Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #197611

A house built c. 1870 and subsequently altered. Application is to construct a rear addition.

HDC objects to this proposed rear addition. The proposed addition’s large arch and I-beam appears more as the ground floor retail of a primary façade rather than the rear of an 1870 rowhouse. While one set back might be appropriate here, the second balcony is unfortunate because it erases the third floor, subsequently eliminating any historic fabric from this facade. Given the applicant’s extensive undertaking in expanding the rear, our committee hopes that the façade will eventually be restored.


Item 5

116 Lafayette Avenue – Fort Greene Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #197155

An Italianate style rowhouse designed by Robert White and built in 1860. Application is to demolish a dormer window, and install a mansard roof.

HDC urges the applicant to refer to the historic 1930s photo of 116 Lafayette which shows 2 over 2 windows used on the entire façade. Given the applicant’s proposal to outfit the dormers with 2 over 2 windows, we would like to see these windows used on the rest of the façade, in keeping with the historic character of this building. Additionally, we wonder if the proposed hand railing is necessary given the fact that there is no habitable terrace on the roof. If a railing is desired, we recommend both the rear and front railings be set back in order to comply with the six-foot setback regulation and reduce visibility from the street. 


Item 7

55 7th Avenue – Park Slope Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #181560

A Second Empire style rowhouse built in 1871-72. Application is to construct a rooftop addition.

The Park Slope Historic District designation report calls this stretch of 7th Avenue “a dignified blockfront of French Second Empire design” and points out that it is the “only complete blockfront of mansard roofed houses in Park Slope.” Given this superlative, HDC finds the proposed rooftop addition to be inappropriate as it will be highly visible and mar the only row of intact mansards. The impact of this proposed addition is heightened because of the visibility into the rear yards from Lincoln Place. As mansard roofs are made of wood, HDC is also concerned about the structural feasibility of adding such a large addition to the roof, especially since the proposal; did not seem to show appropriate supports. 


Item 17

248 West 71st Street – West End Collegiate Extension Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #196039

A Renaissance Revival style rowhouse with alterations designed by Thom & Wilson and built in 1892. Application is to modify the front façade and areaway, excavate at the areaway and rear yard, and construct rooftop and rear yard additions.

While the building envelope will remain unchanged, an all-glass rear façade seems out of character for this block. As the commissioners are well aware, windows are not transparent as much as they are translucent, and what is being proposed here is the replacement of a solid masonry box with a shiny one. HDC recommends that the design be rethought to be more in keeping with the basic nature of a masonry rowhouse.


Item 20

301 Park Avenue – The Waldorf Astoria Hotel – Individual Landmark and Interior Landmark

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #Q09644

An Art Deco style hotel skyscraper designed by Schultze & Weaver and built in 1931. Application is to alter portions of the designated interior spaces.

HDC commends the applicants on a thorough and spectacular presentation, fitting for a project of this importance, but we did notice some details which require attention. Our committee would like to see the historic 1931 chandeliers in the Silver Corridor on the 3rd floor replicated. We would also like to draw the Commission’s attention to a proposed alteration to the main lobby. Regarding the portals into the north and south lounges, historic photos show the original central bay to have a distinct tall articulation with a very strong vertical expression, characteristic of art deco design. The proposed changes look more like the existing conditions than the historic ones, however, and our committee would like to see the hierarchical expression of the cross axis returned. We would also like to see the clock returned as part of the treatment of that bay, which is slated to be removed.

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags:

Now Hiring: Spanish-Language Fellow

Posted by on Monday, April 24, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

Seize the opportunity to preserve, improve, and celebrate the places that make New York great

Introducing the Spanish-Language Fellowship

The Historic Districts Council was recently awarded funding by Governor Cuomo and the New York State Council on the Arts to hire a paid Spanish-language fellow to work on outreach, organizing, and education efforts in bilingual communities throughout New York City!

The position is open to current undergraduates due to complete their studies in the spring as well as those who may have graduated a semester early this year.

This is a paid position with full medical and dental benefits. Qualified undergraduates with an interest in architecture, historic preservation, New York history, or community organizing should apply as soon as possible.

View The Posting

¡Trabaja con Nosotros! Beca para Hispanoparlantes:

El Consejo para los Distritos Históricos recién ha recibido financiamiento de parte del Gobernador Andrew Cuomo y del Consejo para las Artes del Estado de Nueva York para contratar un becario hispanoparlante a quien se le pagará para trabajar en la coordinación y organización de actividades educativas en comunidades bilingües de la Ciudad de Nueva York.

Esta oferta laboral está disponible para estudiantes de bachillerato que se han de graduar en la primavera del 2017 y también para aquellos que se hayan graduado anteriormente en el presente curso escolar.

El trabajo es pago y con cobertura completa de beneficios médicos y dentales. Los estudiantes de bachillerato con las cualificaciones debidas e interés en la arquitectura, la conservación del patrimonio construido, la historia de la ciudad de Nueva York ó el trabajo comunitario deben aplicar lo antes posible.

Category: Featured, Uncategorized · Tags:

HARLEM & THE FUTURE

Posted by on Sunday, April 9, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

A day-long conference focused on West Harlem’s resilience-Saturday, April 29, 2017 9AM-5PM

HARLEM & THE FUTURE:

 Preserving Culture & Sustaining Historic Character in a Changing Environment

 

Join us at a day-long conference focused on West Harlem’s resilience in the face of neighborhood change.

Today, what do you think of when you think of Harlem? Will the future Harlem still resonate its past? That question will be explored while reflecting on Harlem’s unique cultural heritage, built environment, and social fabric. Come to learn and connect with the community that seeks to preserve its cultural and architectural legacies. The day will entail keynote speakers, panel discussions, walking tours, and a film screening titled Gentrification.  

 

WHEN: SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 2017

9AM-5PM

ADDRESS: The City College of New York Spitzer School of Architecture

141 Convent Avenue at 135th Street in West Harlem

COST: $10.00 LUNCH & WALKING TOUR INCLUDED! SENIORS & STUDENTS FREE

4 AIA LU / NY State credits available 

#harlemsfuture #westharlemcpo

For more details, visit www.westharlemcpo.org

Sponsors:

West Harlem Community Preservation Organization,  SAVE Harlem Now! Historic Districts Council,

The City College of New York, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, The New York City Landmarks Conservancy, Mount Morris Park Community Improvement Association,

Landmark West!, Manhattan Community Boards 9 and 10, The Audubon Park Alliance

 

Funded in part by City Council Member Mark Levine & Historic Districts Council

 

Home Page Image Credit: Olalekan Jeyifous

Category: Featured, Six to Celebrate · Tags: , ,

Hart Island Project Lecture

Posted by on Thursday, April 6, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

Founder of The Hart Island Project, Melinda Hunt will present a public lecture on April 24th at 6:30pm

The Historic Districts Council presents a public lecture

by artist Melinda Hunt,

founder of The Hart Island Project.

A newly dug trench for a mass grave of 150 adults.

New York University
College of Arts and Science
Silver Center, Room 300
100 Washington Square East
New York

(Enter on Waverly Street) 

6:30 PM- 8:00 PM

City Cemetery on Hart Island is the largest municipal burial ground in the United States. Located in the Long Island Sound, just a stone’s throw from City Island, Hart Island was purchased by New York City in 1868 for the purpose of opening a Branch Workhouse for older boys from the House of Refuge on Randall’s Island. One hundred and fifty years later, young misdemeanants still bury unclaimed bodies in common graves at City Cemetery. Last year, around 1200 bodies were released for city burial by the Medical Examiner. Hart Island is the final resting place of over one million people and counting.

Formed in 2011 to raise awareness, support for family and friends of the buried, and access to records and maps, The Hart Island Project hosts a storytelling platform called the Traveling Cloud Museum. This award winning digital platform has made the burial process, which is largely unchanged since 1872, visible. The organization works to dispel popular misconceptions about Hart Island including a belief that New York City is running out of burial space.

This lecture and discussion will focus on how this historic burial process serves New Yorkers and explore its potential as a park and urban natural burial facility. Rich in history, Hart Island may hold the secret to a sustainable, ecological municipal burial practice.

$15 General Admission

Free for students

Category: Event, Six to Celebrate · Tags:

Open to the Public – Making Our Story Heard! Conference Tours

Posted by on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

HDC will host five walking tours of a diverse range of neighborhoods and sites on weekends in April


Conference Program

More Information about the 2017 Conference


Sunday, April 30 at 1:00PM          Greenwich Village’s Legacy of Activism

From class warfare in Astor Place to garment workers and beatnik musicians in and around Washington Square to anarchists on the Gold Coast to gay men outside a bar, Greenwich Village has witnessed and been host to some of America’s most important and impactful activism. The impressive roster of protests on all manner of issues that have taken place on its streets throughout its history has changed the world for the better. Join us for a tour led by Philip Desiere of Walk About New York, as he highlights some of Greenwich Village’s seminal protest locations that mark how New Yorkers and, more broadly, United States citizens have made their voices heard to help make America a more just place to live.


Tuesday, May 9 at 3pm  Port Authority Bus Terminal

Encompassing nearly two full city blocks, the Port Authority Bus Terminal is the biggest and busiest bus terminal on the planet — and a striking example of postmodern utilitarian architecture. Join the Historic Districts Council for a rare look behind the scenes of this Midtown Manhattan workhorse, which was originally opened in 1950 and was expanded and substantially renovated from the late 1970s to the early 1980s. The tour will be led by Mark Schaff, Assistant General Manager of the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and will include a visit to the new Performing Arts Stage. The Performing Arts Stage was created with the help of the Historic Districts Council’s own Deputy Director, Adrian Untermyer. Following the tour, participants are invited to join us for a drink at McAnn’s, an Irish pub located within the Port Authority that boasts oversized historic photographs of the original 1950s terminal.

 


Sunday, April 2, 3:00PM                Behind-the-Scenes Tour of King Manor

Join us for a tour of the home of Rufus King, signer of the United States Constitution and early voice in the anti-slavery movement. Originally constructed in the 1750s, King lived here from 1805 until his death in 1827. Located in Jamaica, the Colonial-era structure now functions as a house museum, and is the only such museum in southeastern Queens. Executive Director of the King Manor Museum (and former HDC staff member!) Nadezhda Williams will give us a behind-the-scenes peak on this extended tour, which will encompass the entire house from the basement to the attic and from the servants’ quarters to the King family’s parlor. Explore how the house, a designated New York City Individual and Interior Landmark, tells its history of three major phases of construction (c1750, c1790 and 1810) and still holds a few mysteries.


 

Saturday, April 8 at 10:30AM      Sunset Park: History and Advocacy

Join tour guide Joe Svehlak on this tour of Sunset Park, whose built environment has shaped what is today a quintessential Brooklyn neighborhood: from the massive Bush Terminal and its associated workers’ housing to the construction of the 4th Avenue Subway, and from the establishment of the country’s first cooperative apartment buildings in the early 1900s to the Section 8 housing of the 1970s, which helped the neighborhood transition out of blight. For the past four years, advocates and residents have led a grassroots effort to push for the designation of a historic district in Sunset Park to pay homage to these developments and allow the neighborhood’s storied past to inform its future. While the effort stalls at the City level, many lessons can be learned in this case study about the power of community organizing and public participation?


Sunday, April 23 at 11:00AM       In Search of the Tenderloin and Tin Pan Alley

From the 1870s to about 1910, the Tenderloin was Manhattan’s most famous red-light district, a cradle of elegant vice that developed north of 23rd Street west of Fifth Avenue, in the shadow of luxurious hotels such as Gilsey House. High-stakes gambling parlors, brothels, saloons, dance halls: the Tenderloin reveled in its own illegality, until pressure from civic authorities and corporate development led to its demise. Since the 1990s, zoning changes have altered the landscape of the old Tenderloin’s main stem – Sixth Avenue – and have led to the destruction of many buildings. But a few reminders survive. On this tour, author and historian David Freeland will guide visitors to sites associated with still-visible Tenderloin businesses, including the block of 28th Street once known as Tin Pan Alley, birthplace of the pop music industry.


Sunday, April 23 at 11:00AM       In Search of the Tenderloin and Tin Pan Alley

From the 1870s to about 1910, the Tenderloin was Manhattan’s most famous red-light district, a cradle of elegant vice that developed north of 23rd Street west of Fifth Avenue, in the shadow of luxurious hotels such as Gilsey House. High-stakes gambling parlors, brothels, saloons, dance halls: the Tenderloin reveled in its own illegality, until pressure from civic authorities and corporate development led to its demise. Since the 1990s, zoning changes have altered the landscape of the old Tenderloin’s main stem – Sixth Avenue – and have led to the destruction of many buildings. But a few reminders survive. On this tour, author and historian David Freeland will guide visitors to sites associated with still-visible Tenderloin businesses, including the block of 28th Street once known as Tin Pan Alley, birthplace of the pop music industry.


Support is provided in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Additional support is provided by City Council Members Ben Kallos, Rosie Mendez, Mark Levine, Inez Dickens, Vincent Gentile, Corey Johnson, Stephen Levin, Margaret Chin, Daniel Garodnick and Rafael Salamanca, and by New York State Assembly Members Deborah Glick, Richard Gottfried and Daniel O’Donnell.

Category: conference, Featured · Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

YORKVILLE’S IMMIGRATION HISTORY: THREE TOURS

Posted by on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

Join HDC and Francis Morrone for a comprehensive look at the immigrant history of the Upper East Side of Manhattan

YORKVILLE’S IMMIGRATION HISTORY:

Saturday, April 1 at 2:00PM

Saturday, May 6 at 2:00PM

Saturday, June 3 at 2:00PM

 

Join HDC and Francis Morrone for a comprehensive look at a curiously under-recognized swatch of New York’s rich historic fabric. In three tours we will focus on the fascinating immigrant history of this part of the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The first tour will have a bit of a focus on the Czechs, the second on the Hungarians, the third on the Germans, though all three groups, and several others, will be represented in all three tours. In addition, we will look at the broader demographic history (especially the century-long history of gentrification), and how that history is manifested in architecture, and at the histories of housing, religion, institutions, breweries, and much else. Each tour will begin outside one of the stations of the new Second Avenue Subway–72nd Street, 86th Street, and 96th Street, and will weave among the blocks between Third Avenue and the East River. Tour 1 will cover 72nd to 79th Streets, Tour 2 will cover 79th to 86th Streets, and Tour 3 will cover 86th to 96th Streets. This is a rare opportunity for an in-depth, many-faceted study on foot of a whole, remarkably diverse neighborhood.

REGISTER:

MAY 6TH TOUR

JUNE 3RD TOUR

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional support is provided by New York City Council Member Ben Kallos.

Category: Event, Featured, Six to Celebrate · Tags:

HDC’s Preservation School | Spring 2017

Posted by on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

Come learn the basics and then some about Historic Preservation- AIA Credit Available; 6:00-8:00pm

The Historic Districts Council is pleased to present a series of classes that will illuminate the essentials of historic preservation. Whether you live in a historic district, serve on your local community board or just want to learn about the built environment of your city, these classes will provide you with knowledge and vocabulary about historic preservation practice in New York City. The classes are designed to cover the basics over four sessions to give participants an overall understanding of such topics as land use planning and building types in New York City, and instruct hands-on skills, including how to read architectural drawings and how to best research and photograph buildings.


$15 each 

Scholarships available

please contact Michelle Arbulu marbulu@hdc.org


Wednesday, April 26

Architectural Photography & Social Media for Preservation Campaigns

Historic Preservation is first and foremost a visual field. This session will cover two important topics pertaining to marketing and messaging. The first part will provide tips and tricks to improve your photos of buildings and streetscapes in order to maximize their impact. The second part will teach participants how to harness the power of social media to enhance preservation campaigns, build a constituency and sound a call-to-action. Participants will leave with practical strategies to better manage their organizational “brand” and drive traffic to social media profiles and websites.

(Instructors: Lynn Massimo & Cristiana Peña)

REGISTER 


Wednesday, April 5:     

Preservation 101 & Basics of Land Use Planning in NYC

This introductory course will begin with an overview of the various regulations and funding mechanisms used to preserve historic buildings in New York City. The second part of the session will familiarize participants with the broader umbrella under which preservation falls: land use planning. This section will cover New York City’s governing structure, how zoning works and New York City’s Uniform Land Use Review Process (ULURP).

(Instructor: Tara Kelly)


Wednesday, April 12:

NYC Architectural Styles & How to Research Buildings

2 AIA Approved LU/HSW Credits/ 2 NY State Licensing Credits

The first part of this session will focus on common architectural styles and building types found in New York City’s historic built environment, and instruct participants on how to identify them by their distinguishing features. The second part of the session will guide participants on tools and strategies for researching buildings in New York City, including various repositories and document types. Learn the basics of how to investigate the origins and stories behind historic properties.

(Instructor: Gregory Dietrich)

$100 for AIA/NYS credit


Wednesday, April 19

Reading Architectural Drawings & Overview of Common NYC Building Materials

Architectural drawings and renderings illustrate the often complicated design and construction plans for proposed building projects. The first part of this session will teach participants how to evaluate such documents in order to understand and analyze an upcoming construction project. The second part of the session will provide an overview of common building materials used in New York City, including terra-cotta, brick, brownstone, concrete and much more. The session will explain how these materials are employed, how to identify them, and “scratch the surface” on their maintenance and conservation.

(Instructors: Dan Allen & Brendan Coburn)


Classes:

$15 each or $50 for all 4 classes

Scholarships available

please contact Michelle Arbulu at marbulu@hdc.org

Classes will take place at:

Neighborhood Preservation Center

232 East 11 Street

New York, NY 10003

6:00PM


Support is provided in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Additional support is provided by City Council Members Ben Kallos, Rosie Mendez, Mark Levine, Inez Dickens, Vincent Gentile, Corey Johnson, Stephen Levin, Margaret Chin, Dan Garodnick, and Rafael Salamanca and New York State Assembly Members Deborah Glick, Richard Gottfried, and Daniel O’Donnell.

Category: Featured, Program & Events · Tags:

HDC@LPC – Testimony for LPC Hearing on April 4, 2017

Posted by on Monday, April 3, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

Item 1

244 Dean Street – Boerum Hill Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #196163

A frame house built in 1857-58. Application is to construct a rear yard addition, excavate the rear yard and replace windows.

HDC finds the proposed rear yard addition to be too busy, with too many architectural moves happening simultaneously. The result is each floor appearing as three different sets of ideas and should be simplified into a more coherent design. Regarding the rear fenestration, the application proposes square windows on a house with nothing square on it. Either the top story should be preserved, or the new window design should recall a historic proportion. 

LPC determination: Approved


Item 3

418A Lewis Avenue – Bedford Stuyvesant/Expanded Stuyvesant Heights Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #184647

A rowhouse built c. 1870-71 and later altered. Application is to alter the façade and entry and construct a rear addition.

HDC is concerned with the size of the rear yard addition, which doubles the volume of the house and is out of scale and context with this rowhouse-scaled block. In addition to violating the 30-foot rear yard requirement, the over-sized addition’s bulk turns this rowhouse into an apartment building and an addition this size would never be permitted in the rear of a single-family house.

LPC determination: Approved


Item 4

209 Broadway – St. Paul’s Chapel – Individual Landmark

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #199018

A Georgian style church building and graveyard attributed to Thomas McBean and built in 1764-1766, with a porch added in 1767-1768, and a tower designed by James Crommelin Lawrence added in 1794. Application is to modify a fence and install a barrier-free access ramp.

HDC commends the applicants for this proposal. It is refreshing to see a sensitive solution for an accessibility ramp on a cherished landmark building which does not detract from the façade. 

 

LPC determination: Approved


Item 5

38 West 10th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #198768

An altered Anglo-Italianate style rowhouse built in 1858. Application is to modify the front façade and rooftop and to install an areaway gate.

HDC commends the restoration of the façade to its original historic appearance, but our committee is concerned about the layer of history that is being removed in this proposal. We recommend that the applicant preserve the studio window which, historically, has defined the artistic character of Greenwich Village.

Item was laid over day of hearing. 


Item 6

699 Fifth Avenue – The St. Regis Hotel – Individual Landmark

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #199023

A Beaux-Arts style hotel building designed by Trowbridge & Livingston and built in 1901-1904, with an extension designed by Sloan & Robertson and built in 1927. Application is to amend Certificate of Appropriateness 19-0847 and alter the Fifth Avenue façade, install storefront infill, awnings, signage, and display vitrines.

HDC finds the nine signs proposed in this application to be excessive. Our committee has faith in shoppers’ ability to identify this store using fewer signs.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications


Item 7

150 Riverside Drive – Riverside – West End Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #191266

A Neo-Renaissance style apartment building designed by Maurice Deutsch and built in 1926-28. Application is to install a marquee and signage.

The building’s marquee already calls attention to this prominent apartment building and thus HDC finds the proposed corner signage to be excessive and unnecessary. With no precedent for this kind of signage in this historic district, and given the building’s prominent corner siting, HDC asks the Commission to deny the corner sign on this building’s base. 

LPC determination: Approved


Item 9

277 West End Avenue – West End Collegiate Extension I Historic District

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, Docket #197895

A Medieval Revival style apartment building designed by George & Edward Blum and built in 1925-26. Application is to establish a master plan governing the future replacement of windows.

It is unfortunate when a master plan arrives at LPC and a standard one-over-one aluminum window formula is proposed. Master plans are inherently an opportunity to correct and improve a building’s appearance and establishing the correct fenestration for the future. Given the clear historic documentation of the original window configuration, HDC would like to see the applicants install six over one windows. Our committee suggests the applicant take advantage of advanced technology that would allow for the use of aluminum clad windows that are cost-effective and historically sensitive. Further, on apartment buildings of this size, the collective fenestration is essential to the overall building’s character. With this in mind, George and Edward Blum had a particular aesthetic in mind when they chose the windows that they did. This careful attention to detail should be followed, especially now that we have the chance with a master plan. 

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags:

2017 Grassroots Preservation Awards- John J. Harvey Fireboat

Posted by on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 · Leave a Comment 

 

Architect and preservationist Huntley Gill likes to get people out onto the water. He is the Captain of the fireboat John J. Harvey, which he and a dedicated group of volunteers saved from the scrap yard. Launched in 1931, the fireboat served the City of New York and New York Harbor until she retired in 1994. She was historic first; the first fireboat powered by internal combustion engines, and the largest, fastest fire fighting machine of her time, capable of pumping 18,000 gallons per minutes. On September 11, 2001, John J. Harvey was recalled to service by FDNY and reactivated, pumping water for 80 hours until water mains in Lower Manhattan were restored to service. Today the fireboat is moored at Pier 66 Maritime, at 26th Street and the Hudson River. The fireboat now serves as a operational museum and educational center, offering free public trips to New Yorkers and visitors.

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