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A list of HDC’s upcoming events as well as our annual programs, and breaking preservation news.

 

Events:

HDC is always busy, view our Past Events page to see what other evens we’ve held.

Programs:

 

News:

Re:Neighborhood Values: NY Post, July 5, 2014

Demolition freeze may cover 80% of the city: Crains, April 14, 2014

The Historic Districts Council says the city’s historic districts are not to blame for the shortage of affordable housing: Daily News, February 26, 2014

Landlords take aim at rampant landmarking: Crains New York,July 11, 2013

Landmark advocates recall Alamo-like efforts: Chelsea Now, November 3, 2012

New York Landmark Status Misused, Says Group Preservationists say New York’s history under attack:Epoch Times, June 21, 2012

Preservationists Issue Rallying Cry, Prepare to Save Landmarks Law from Big Real Estate: New York Observer, June 14th, 2012

Defending Historic Preservation in New York City

PS 31 - The Castle

PS 31 – The Castle

Although community advocates have achieved some big successes in recent years gaining long-sought landmark designations and thwarting (or at least modifying) destructive proposals to historic buildings, historic preservation as both a strategy and as a philosophy is under attack as never before. Emboldened by years of record growth, the Real Estate Board of New York, the principal lobbyist for organized real estate, has been relentless in its campaign to undermine the Landmarks Law and all community preservation efforts. They are accusing preservation efforts of driving up housing costs, endangering affordable housing, stopping job creation and economic growth, protecting worthless buildings and penalizing home and business owners with costly fees and delays. To hear them tell it, landmark designation will transform New York into a lifeless museum city with a “look but don’t touch” mentality. HDC feels that nothing could be further from the truth. REBNY even pursued a serious lobbying effort to transform and weaken the Landmarks Law through a series of bills which would transform how the Landmarks Preservation Commission designated and regulated historic properties. Through HDC’s mobilization of the preservation community, this specific effort was defeated but the threat to preservation laws and historic buildings is still very real.

Preservation practices empower communities, celebrate our history, drive economic growth and sustain development efforts. Preservation enhances our streetscapes, nurtures tourism, encourages investment and employs local labor. It is a popular, populist movement driven by regular New Yorkers who value their homes and their city. The Historic Districts Council works with community groups throughout the five boroughs on efforts to save, preserve and enhance the special character of New York’s historic neighborhoods. We work with communities from areas as different as the Upper West Side and Bedford-Stuyvesant on the shared goal of empowering the community to have a voice in determining their own future. These two communities are ones whose efforts we honored at the Grassroots Preservation Awards and whose successes have been targeted as “over-reaching” by the real estate lobby.

HDC will continue counter arguing REBNY as long as they continue to release studies based on lies  and misconceptions. The threat that REBNY faces to New Yorker’s is very real. Through HDC’s mobilization and education we have been able to keep the preservation community strong, but we will never be as loud as REBNY. We need all the support of our neighborhood partners, history lovers, and lovers of New York.

Additional Resources:

Preservation and Job Creation

Press

 

  • Articles and Media Coverage: Preservation and the Battle to Preserve It

 

 

 HDC continues to vigilantly defend New York City’s Landmarks Law and promotes efforts to strengthen protections for historic buildings. This section will be updated regularly with current events regarding this issue.

New Yorkers against ZQA

Everyone listed below has expressed their opposition to ZQA/MIH

To read HDC’s statement click here / To send a letter to City Council expressing your opposition to ZQA/MIH click here


 

Manhattan Community Boards 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,11,12 (8 and 10 took no action )

Brooklyn Community Boards 1,2,3,5,7,8,9,10,12,13,14,15,16,17,18

Bronx Community Boards 1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12

Queens Community Boards 1,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12,13,14,( 10 took no action)

Staten Island Community Boards 1,2,3

New York City Planning Commissioner Irwin G.Cantor

New York City Planning Commissioner Rayann Besser

New York City Planning Commissioner Orlando Marin

#SaveNYC (Citywide)

100 West 16th Street Block Association (Manhattan)

29th Street Neighborhood Association (Manhattan)

Aburndale Improvement Association, Inc. (Queens)

Art Loisaida Foundation/9 BC Tompkins Square Block Association (Manhattan)

Bayside Hills Civic Association (Queens)

Bedford Stuyvesant Society for Historic Preservation (Brooklyn)

Broadway-Flushing Homeowners Association (Queens)

Brooklyn Heights Association (Brooklyn)

Brooklyn Housing Preservation Alliance (Brooklyn)

Carnegie Hill Neighbors (Manhattan)

Coalition to Save the East Village (Manhattan)

Cobble Hill Association, Inc. (Brooklyn)

Committee for Environmentally Sound Development (Manhattan)

Community Development Project, Urban Justice Center (Citywide)

Cooper Square Committee (Manhattan)

East 34th Street Block Association (Manhattan)

East Harlem Preservation, Inc. (Manhattan)

East Village Community Coalition (Manhattan)

Fiske Terrace Association (Brooklyn)

Flushing Heights Civic Association (Queens)

Four Borough Neighborhood Preservation Alliance (Citywide)

Friends of Brook Park (Bronx)

Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts (Manhattan)

Gramercy Park Block Association (Manhattan)

Greater Astoria Historical Society (Queens)

Greenwich Village Community Task Force (Manhattan)

Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (Manhattan)

Hell’s Kitchen Neighborhood Association (Manhattan)

Historic Districts Council (Citywide)

Historic Park Avenue (Manhattan)

Landmark West! (Manhattan)

Lefferts Manor Association (Brooklyn)

Madison-Marine-Homecrest Civic Association (Brooklyn)

Marine Park Civic Association (Brooklyn)

Morningside Heights Historic District Committee (Manhattan)

New York Landmarks Conservancy (Citywide)

New York Preservation Alliance (Brooklyn)

Park Slope Civic Council (Brooklyn)

Parkway Village Historical Society (Queens)

Preservation Greenpoint (Brooklyn)

Queens Borough Historian (Queens)

Queens Civic Congress (Queens)

Society for Clinton Hill (Brooklyn)

South Midwood Residents Association (Brooklyn)

Sunnyside Gardens Preservation Alliance (Queens)

Take Back NYC (Citywide)

TenantNet (Citywide)

Tribeca Trust (Manhattan)

Turtle Bay Association (Manhattan)

Vinegar Hill Neighborhood Association (Brooklyn)

West 45th Street Block Association (Manhattan)

West Brighton Preservation Society (Staten Island)

Kate Allen

Newman Amy

Marilyn Appleberg

Elizabeth Ashby

Warren Ashworth

John Bacon

Penelope Bareau

Edward Becker

Nancy Beranbaum

Judith Ann Berdy

Murray Berger

Marjorie Berk

Miriam Berkley

Doug Beube

Susan Binger

Alyssa Bishop

Françoise Bollack

Gretchen Borges

Terrence P. Brennan

Hal Bromm

Mary B. Brown

Harry Bubbins

Michele Campo

Elizabeth Capelle

Kelly Carroll

Ronald Christensen

Rita C. Chu

Mary Clarke

Barbara Coffey

Evelyn Collier

Thomas Collins

Taryn Cook

Andrea Coyle

Doris Cruz

Theo. David

Rosemary De Figlio

Joan DeCamp

Britt Densmore

Ralph DePas

Marlene Donnelly

Margaret Doyle

Sara Durkacs

Aron Eisenpress

Linda Eklund

Lynn Ellsworth

Aline and Henry P. Euler

Mary Ann Fastook

Barry R. Feldman

Horace Felix

Mary Lou Fenster

Julie M Finch

Cinnia Finfer

Richard George

David Golab

Renee Gold

Mark Goldberg

Andrea M. Goldwyn

David Goodrich

Christabel Gough

Terry Grace

Crista Grauer

Alison Greenberg

Amy Greer

Mitchell Grubler

Theodore Grunewald

Rachel Heiman

Roberta HERSHENSON

Margo Hirsch

Peter Hirsch

Victoria Hofmo

Sylvia R. Hoisington

Susan Hopper

Rickie James

Elizabeth Jeffe

Jamie Jensen

Karen Johnson

Barbara E. Johnson

John S. Jurayj

Nina Kandel

Holly Kaye

Klaus Kirschbaum

Ira Kluger

Nancy Koenigsberg

David A. Korman

Joan Kreiss

Carlo Lamagna

Gayle Lennon

David Levine

Christopher London

Cate Ludlam

Colleen Lynch

Dianna Maeurer

Cynthia Mailman

Elide Manente

Elizabeth Mann

Lizbeth Marano

Linda Mariano

Harry Matthews

Sibyl D. McCormack Groff

Kevin McEvoy

Katrina Miles

Erica Morasset

Stephen Morgan

Anne Namm

Barbara Neuhaus

Susan Paston

Ray Pepi

Jonathon and Madelane Piel

Gina Pollara

Jason Pollock

Judith Glazer Raymo

Joy Rich

Madelyn Roesch

Garden Roman

Sara Romanoski

Gina Ross

Linda Scher

Julia Schoeck

Joan Scholvin

Katherine Schoonover

Harry Schwartz

Ruth Siekevitz

Aaron Sosnick

Jean Standish

B. Stuchin

Zulmilena Then

Simon Rolf Thoresen

Adrian Untermyer

Franklin Vagnone

Stephen A. Varone

Raymond Vinciguerra

Thomas Von Foerster

Cathy Wassylenko

Laura Weiss

Zack Winestine

Charles Wittman

Kate Wood

Suzanne Wray

Deborah Young

Howard Charles Yourow

Linda Yowell

Shirley Zafirau

Joan Zimmerman

 

Join the Historic Districts Council, the Community and Borough Boards in opposing the

Zoning for Quality and Affordability; Mandatory Inclusionary Housing Proposal 

Category: Upzoning · Tags:

LPC Backlog 95 Decisions: Feb 23!!

Posted by on Friday, February 5, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

LANDMARKS COMMISSION TO ACT ON 95 BACKLOG PROPERTIES

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Back Log PM- 2.5.2016

Decisions on the 95 backlog items will be made on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016 at the Landmarks Preservation Commission (One Centre Street, 9th Floor).

Plan to attend and help HDC fill the room to show support for these potential NYC Landmarks. 

This public meeting is the culmination of last fall’s special public hearings, at which HDC testified on nearly every item in every borough. These special Landmarks Under Consideration were one of HDC’s Six to Celebrate in 2015. Please refresh your memory and browse HDC’s extensive archive of these properties with our statements here.

The February 23 public meeting will run as follows:

  1. The LPC Research Department will present backlog items with their recommendations to the Commissioners. Recommendations are based on LPC research files on these properties, as well as nearly 12 hours of verbal testimony from more than 300 speakers and thousands of pages of additional written testimony submitted by the public. These recommendations are the framework by which the Commissioners will cast their votes.
  2. Commissioners will discuss backlog properties after Research Staff presents recommendations.
  3. Commissioners will decide whether to:

(a) prioritize properties for designation;

(b) remove non-priority properties from the calendar by taking No Action. No Action is an administrative process that allows an item to be taken off the calendar without judgment on the merits, and allows it to be reconsidered for designation without prejudice in the future; or

(c) remove properties from the calendar by voting to not designate based on merit.

What we don’t know: 

At this moment, HDC is unaware if each property will be heard individually, or if the properties will be heard in groups, similar to the special public hearings. HDC will update you as soon as possible.

**A schedule of all Backlog 95 properties will be available on Feb. 19 here.**

Category: Landmarks Preservation Commission, Six to Celebrate · Tags:

2016 Six to Celebrate Launch Party

Posted by on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

STC_Logo_Web

2016 Six to Celebrate Launch Party- January 28th, 6 pm, South Street Seaport Museum’s Melville Gallery, 213 Water St.
Introducing the 2016 Six to Celebrate!

Six to Celebrate annually identifies six historic NYC neighborhoods that merit preservation. These will be priorities for HDC’s advocacy and consultation over a yearlong period.

To honor our new Six to Celebrate we will be hosting a party at the South Street Seaport Museum’s Melville Gallery at 213 Water, on January 28th at 6 pm!

To read more about the 2016 Six to Celebrate go to our Six to Celebrate website 6tocelebrate.org

Friends $20

General Admission $25

Category: Program & Events, Six to Celebrate · Tags:

Moving Fast: ZQA/MIH at City Council Feb 9&10!

Posted by on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

A wholesale upzoning of all five boroughs is a handout to developers. 

ZQA towers- KC

This is the last step before a vote. Please join HDC in speaking up on Feb. 9 & 10!

Tell City Council that New Yorkers deserve affordable housing without upzoning the entire city. They have the power to make these decisions, but need to hear from YOU.

One Size Does Not Fit All! Stand with New York City’s Communities Against the Mayor’s Plan to Overdevelop Our Neighborhoods

Who: NYC City Council

What: Public Hearing on Zoning for Quality & Affordability (ZQA); Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH)

Where: City Hall, City Hall Park (Manhattan)

When: Tuesday, Feb. 9, 9:30 am (MIH ONLY) & Wednesday, Feb. 10, 9:30 am (ZQA ONLY)

Can’t make the hearing? Send a letter HERE

Earlier this year, HDC testified at the City Planning Commission’s scoping hearing against Zoning for Quality and Affordability (ZQA). Since the spring, City Planning amended ZQA to reduce heights for contextual districts, but this has been the only adjustment. As ZQA and its sibling, Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH) were presented before community boards city-wide, where it was disapproved across the boards, including strong opposition from 4 of the 5 Borough Boards. The majority of community boards across the city (including all of the boards in the Bronx) have voted against these proposals DESPITE the Mayor’s promise that they will increase housing affordability.

HDC, alongside partner organizations and hundreds of individuals did not get to testify at the City Planning Commission’s official Public Hearing, as we could not gain access to the building.

Despite the wide opposition, Mayor de Blasio has plans to move full speed ahead. Ignoring the community boards’ votes, he stated: “The folks that are elected by all the people, the council members and the mayor, have to make the final decision.” This is why it is crucial to tell your electeds how you feel on Feb 9th and 10th.

Click here to write Mayor de Blasio and the City Council urging them to listen to NY’s communities and to oppose this plan.

 

READ THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL’S TESTIMONY  HERE 

 

Brief examples of major problems with ZQA/MIH:

 

HDC has a new, simpler email advocacy system.  Please take a moment  to quickly fill out the form to click to have your voice heard in the future. It’s just a moment of your time today to make a world of difference in the future of our beloved city.

Category: Upzoning · Tags: , ,

Historic Districts Council Statement to NYC City Council on ZQA/MIH

Posted by on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

The Historic Districts Council is the citywide advocate for New York’s historic neighborhoods. We represent over 500 neighborhood-based groups dedicated to preserving the physical character of their communities. Many of our constituents have spent years working with property owners, Community Boards, City Planning and elected officials to enact appropriate zoning in order to better protect the character of their neighborhoods and encourage new development which enhances where they call home. It is on their behalf that we address our very strong concerns about these proposed citywide zoning text amendments.

HDC echoes the numerous civic organizations and community boards citywide in our opposition to Zoning for Quality and Affordability (ZQA). ZQA is a wholesale upzoning of the entire city, and will not guarantee either goal of affordability or quality. There is no panacea for New York’s affordable housing crisis, and ZQA is not even a cure for its symptoms. Rather, it seems that ZQA is a concession to developers to sweeten Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH). MIH is the only part of this proposal which might actually provide “affordable” units. ZQA loosens the entire city’s existing zoning to allow greater density for market-rate development, under the guise of creating affordable units, which, as we all know, is optional. The provisions for seniors have an expire after thirty years, after which will be converted to more market rate housing.

This upzoning amendment raises height limits and diminishes yard requirements across the city according to a mathematical nicety, without examining the built fabric of our city’s neighborhoods. Contextual zones came to fruition after years of effort by community-driven, carefully examined, neighborhood-specific studies. New York thrives because of the diversity of its neighborhoods, yet this proposal’s approach will deal with each neighborhood as the same, with a one-size-fits-all approach. A calculation of potential growth based on a model is not the same as actual development, especially when one considers the diversity of New York’s built environment. This potential impact will be consequential to contextually-zoned properties, as well as buildings in historic districts, where additional five feet will impact the uniform streets and pressure the LPC to approve taller buildings.

The Mayor’s administrative priority of our City’s housing crisis has been stated as two-fold: the creation and the preservation of affordable units. Thus far, the only push has been for creation, calling for a text amendment which will re-write our neighborhoods. There is a piece missing from this affordable housing armature, which is the preservation of units. ZQA might incentivize demolition of existing housing in order to replace it with new development utilizing the proposed as-of-right height limits. The success of MIH, as proposed, is dependent on upzoning, which encourage the demolition of existing building stock. Nearly half (47%) of all housing in New York City is rent regulated, which translates to approximately 1,025,000 units. Where is the plan for the preservation of these units? Smaller buildings which are 100% rent regulated should be identified and spared from ZQA, which could replace them with taller buildings with a 20% affordable component.

The notion that the City can only house people by relying on private investment with a market component lacks vision, while providing ZQA as relief for MIH is apologetic. HDC and civic leaders are grappling with what public good ZQA will actually provide, as an all-borough rezoning raises red flags, and is extremely rare. Further, MIH’s success is contingent on a massive upzoning on par with urban renewal, again as a plea to developers. This formula works under the assumption that affordable construction in New York will halt unless 200% bigger buildings with meager inclusionary units is the deal. In a housing crisis, why not demand 100% affordable units in rezoned areas and a percentage of affordable units on all new construction? Bigger buildings do not equal lower rents, if that were the case, West 57th Street would be Manhattan’s newest neighborhood for the middle class.

Category: Upzoning · Tags:

Public Shut Out from CPC’s Public Hearing on ZQA/MIH

Posted by on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

meme
Were you left outside, too? The Historic Districts Council, NY Landmarks Conservancy, MAS, Friends of the Upper East Side, Landmark West!, and the Society for the Architecture of the City were unable to testify at the City Planning Commission’s public hearing for ZQA/MIH this morning because the room was at capacity by 9:15 am–the hearing commenced at 9:00 am. By 10:30 am, representatives of City Planning explained that attendees who wished to speak could choose to wait outside with no guarantee of entry.  Even worse, the City Planning Commission has not given any indication that they will hold additional hearings to ensure the whole of the public will be heard.
This is a public hearing, not a line on Black Friday. ALL of the public should be able to speak, not just those who got in line several strategic hours earlier than everyone else. There must be allowances made so that all the people of New York can have a voice.
 Please send a letter to Carl Weisbrod, Chair of NYC City Planning Commission and tell him that this morning’s situation was untenable and that our voices deserve to be in the record on this unprecedented rezoning proposal. Everyone deserves a chance to be heard and not be left out in the cold.
Read HDC’s statement here.

Dear Chair Weisbrod,
I am one of hundreds that your agency, the City Planning Commission, turned away this morning at the only public hearing for ZQA/MIH. It is critical that the public have a voice in this process. Blocking access to a public hearing is alarming public policy and issues of this magnitude need to engage the broadest band of the public, not just people who arrived early.
The failure of your agency to anticipate a large turnout for the most crucial rezoning proposals of our City (ZQA & MIH) was short-sighted, and not accommodating the profound public interest in this issue is opaque, undemocratic, and violates the spirit and intention of the Uniform Land Use Review Process.
I respectfully request that a second public hearing be held for everyone who was left in the cold today.  Allow us to speak, the same way certain groups were able to speak to your Commissioners this morning. Submitting written statements is not equivalent to face time with your Commission on this enormous citywide proposal.
-The Historic Districts Council

Category: Upzoning · Tags:

Free Info Session for Preservation Grants: NYC – 2/5

Posted by on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

Applications due by 4/11/16 for League’s Signature Grant Programs

 

ALBANY, January 25, 2016 – Not-for-profit groups and municipalities are invited to attend a free information session on Preserve New York and Technical Assistance Grants (TAG), the signature grant programs of the Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA).

The meeting will be held on Friday, Feb. 5 from 12 noon to 1:00 p.m. at the Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street in New York. Erin Tobin, the League’s Director of Preservation, will explain the requirements of the grants, the process of applying, and discuss some successful previous applicants. The meeting is hosted by the Neighborhood Preservation Center, reservations are required, and seating is limited. Please call (212) 228-2781 or email npc@neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org to register.

A total of $265,128 available in 2016. This includes $255,128 in funding from NYSCA and $10,000 from the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor for the TAG program. The League will disburse this amount over two grant rounds, Preserve New York and TAG in the spring, and an additional TAG funding round in the fall.

“Through its grant programs, the League has strategically invested in the rehabilitation of historic places, leveraged significant additional cash and in-kind resources, and protected properties at the local, state and national level through landmark designations,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “These grants help the League’s growing constituency conserve, protect and use their cultural resources, and are an important catalyst in realizing community preservation goals.”

The application deadline for Spring TAG and 2016 Preserve New York is Monday, April 11. Guidelines for grants are posted on the League’s website at www.preservenys.org. Prospective applicants must discuss proposed projects with Preservation League staff before receiving an application. If you are unable to attend the meeting, you may contact Erin Tobin at 518-462-5658 x 12 for more information or to request an application.

Since 1993, Preserve New York has provided support for historic structure reports, cultural landscape reports and cultural resource surveys. In 2016, the program will also offer grants for building condition reports. The Preservation League especially encourages projects that advance the preservation of neighborhoods and downtowns that qualify for the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit programs; continue the use of historic buildings such as museums, opera houses, theaters, and libraries for cultural, interpretive, and artistic purposes; and identify and preserve architecture and landscapes designed after World War II. Preserve New York grants are likely to range between $3,000 and $15,000.

The League launched the Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) program in 2012 to support projects that preserve New York State’s cultural and historic resources. Not-for-profit arts/cultural groups and municipalities managing arts/cultural facilities are encouraged to apply. The applicant group may apply for short-term, standalone projects that advance the preservation of historic sites, museums, opera houses and theaters, arts facilities and other culturally important institutions that are located in historic buildings and structures that are open to the public. These professional studies include: building conditions surveys, engineering/structural analyses, feasibility/reuse studies and specialized building conservation studies. Preparation of architectural plans and specifications are not eligible. TAG funding will not exceed $3,000 and the total cost of the applicant’s project may not exceed $3,500. Each applicant must provide $500 toward the total project cost.

The Preservation League invests in people and projects that champion the essential role of preservation in community revitalization, sustainable economic growth, and the protection of our historic buildings and landscapes. It leads advocacy, economic development and education programs across New York State.

The Preserve New York Grant and Technical Assistance Grant programs are made possible through funding from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 

For a list of previous grant recipients, visit the League’s website at www.preservenys.org.

Category: Program & Events · Tags:

HDC@LPC – Testimony for LPC Hearing on February 2, 2016

Posted by on Monday, February 1, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

 

Item 1

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

180027- Block 306, lot 18-

202 Warren Street – Cobble Hill Historic District

An Italianate style rowhouse built in 1853-55 and altered in the mid-20th century. Application is to install rooftop solar panels and framing.

HDC suggests that the applicant investigate ways to conceal the solar panels, particularly by asking for a variance from the Fire Department to create a fire path on the east side of the roof to drop the equipment down and out of sight.

202 Warren

LPC Determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 3

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

178758- Block 2104, lot 15-

291 Adelphi Street – Fort Greene Historic District

An Italianate style rowhouse built by built by Thomas Denike c. 1854. Application is to construct a rear addition and excavate the rear yard.

With no precedent for an extension this deep, HDC finds this proposal to be too large an intervention for this house and its context. There are many ways to extend rowhouses into the rear yard more sensitively, both in terms of bulk and materials, so we urge the Commission to ask for further refinement of this proposal.

291 Adelphi Street

LPC Determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 4

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

159422- Block 1685, lot 26-

120 Bainbridge Street – Stuyvesant Heights Historic District

A rowhouse built in 1899. Application is to construct a rooftop addition, install railings, and modify the areaway.

Since the rooftop bulk is extremely visible from Fulton Park, HDC asks that the applicant explore alternative elevators to reduce the height of the bulkhead.

120 Bainbridge

LPC Determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 6

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

179435- Block 5034, lot 88-

43 Rutland Road – Prospect-Lefferts Gardens Historic District

A neo-Renaissance style rowhouse built in 1897 and designed by John J. Petit. Application is to modify masonry openings at the rear façade.

HDC finds the proportion of glass to masonry to be too high on this rear façade, and feels that more work on the details could produce a more sympathetic façade.

43 Rutland existing

43 Rutland proposed

LPC Determination: Approved

 

Item 7

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

168636- Block 592, lot 14-

110 Washington Place – Greenwich Village Historic District

A Federal style townhouse built in 1832-33 and altered in the 1880s with the addition of Queen Anne style elements. Application is to legalize the construction of rooftop addition in non-compliance with Certificate of No Effect 14-2079.

HDC finds that the rooftop addition needs to be set back from the rear of the building, like what was previously approved. It is unlikely that the Commission would approve its present condition had it been proposed this way in the first place.

110 Washington Pl

LPC Determination: No Action

 

Item 8

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

176576- Block 611, lot 12-

54 Charles Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

A Greek Revival style rowhouse designed by Solomon Banta and built in 1839. Application is to construct a rooftop addition, excavate the rear yard, and alter the rear façade.

HDC finds the proposed added bulk to be unjustified. Located near an extremely visible thoroughfare in a heavily trafficked and well-loved historic district, this addition calls too much attention to itself.

54 Charles Street

LPC Determination: No Action

 

Item 9

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

177528- Block 588, lot 79-

19-21 Grove Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

A pair of apartment houses designed by Bruno Berger and built in 1891. Application is to alter the building’s base.

HDC understands and appreciates the motivation to help restore this building’s base, but asks that the applicant work with staff to further refine the details.

19-21 Grove

19-21 Grove proposed

LPC Determination: Approved

 

Item 10

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

179154- Block 575, lot 13-

82 West 12th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

A neo-Classical style apartment building designed by Louis Korn and built in 1902-03. Application is to alter the entrance.

HDC asks that effort be made to restore the lost portal around the entrance, as seen in the 1930s photograph, as it would dramatically improve the proportions and character of the entire building. Taking this theme a step further, the restoration of the lost cornice would also do wonders for the façade’s configuration.

82 W 12 existing

82 W 12 proposed

LPC Determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 13

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

177746- Block 529, lot 15-

348-354 Lafayette Street – NoHo Historic District

A Colonial Revival style institutional building designed by Elisha H. Janes and August W. Cordes and built in 1913. Application is to modify the parapet, construct rooftop additions, install a glass guardrail, storefronts and signage, modify window and door openings, replace windows, and modify the entry.

HDC does not object to the extension of the top floor, as it presents an opportunity to bring back the symmetry that is this building’s hallmark. However, we would prefer to see the top floor set back, even just slightly, so as to prevent the strong cornice line from getting lost, bring back the crenellated roofline, and give the decorative central pediment – a signature feature – some breathing room. As presented, both the cornice and the pediment are lost.

Considering all of the added bulk to the top floor, HDC finds the very large bulkhead to be excessive. To maintain the building’s symmetry, perhaps a mechanical well could be installed at the back and some of the mechanicals could be incorporated into the top floor to avoid this very visible intrusion.

Concerning the base, HDC asks that rather than inserting wide expanses of glass, the storefront windows be redesigned to reflect the triple-bay strategy employed at the corner bays of this building.

348 Lafayette existing

348 Lafayette proposed

LPC Determination: No Action

 

Item 14

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

176963- Block 510, lot 37-

292 Lafayette Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Extension Historic District

A Queen Anne/Renaissance Revival style store building designed by H.J. Schwartzmann and built in 1883. Application is to legalize the installation of a painted wall sign without Landmarks Preservation Commission permit(s) and establish a master plan governing the future installation of painted wall signs.

The brick and limestone banding at the base of this building is a special feature. Not only is it still visible on the north corner of the base, but it is still extant underneath the paint at the south corner. Thus, HDC requests that this banding be restored, especially since a painted wall sign at street level would detract from the building and set an inappropriate precedent.

292 Lafayette

LAID OVER

 

Item 16

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

178526- Block 1218, lot 24-

125 West 87th Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District

A neo-Grec style rowhouse designed by Increase M. Grenell and built in 1883-84. Application is to construct rooftop and rear yard additions.

HDC finds this scheme to be an extravagant intervention, with not only a vast amount of glass in the rear, but much added bulk to both the rear and the rooftop. This type of proposal is not uncommon, but that does not make it appropriate, especially since the rear elevations on this row of houses largely retain their historic configuration and details.

125 W 87 existing

125 W 87

LPC Determination: Approved

 

Item 17

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

175713- Block 1413, lot 13-

125 East 78th Street – Upper East Side Historic District

An Italianate style residence built c. 1871. Application is to construct rear yard and rooftop addition and excavate the rear yard.

This house, like so many others in this corner of Manhattan, was built for a wealthy client, and HDC would argue that it can and does continue to function very well this way. As such, we find it difficult to determine a convincing argument for turning a unique and charming rear elevation into something quite banal, all for a speculative client who may or may not prefer it. We ask the Commission to consider the permanence of this damaging intervention that would result in the loss of so much original material and one of its character-defining features, the rear bay window.

125 E 78 existing-rear

125 E 78 proposed

LPC Determination: Approved

 

Item 19

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

177292- Block 1184, lot 19-

277 West End Avenue – West End-Collegiate Extension Historic District

A Medieval Revival style apartment building designed by George & Edward Blum in 1925-26. Application is to replace windows.

HDC would like to suggest – and encourage – the institution of a Master Plan for the replacement of this building’s windows. The replacement of the existing windows with synthetic divided lights for a six-over-one configuration would be a fantastic first step toward slowly restoring an important feature of this building.

277 WEA-pic

277 WEA

LPC Determination: Approved

 

Item 21

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

173027- Block 1397, lot 37-

890 Park Avenue – Upper East Side Historic District

A Queen Anne style rowhouse designed by James E. Ware and built in 1884-85. Application is to alter the front and side facades, construct rooftop and rear yard additions, and excavate the cellar.

Originally one of a group of rowhouses that wrapped around East 79th Street, 890 Park Avenue is an important survivor from a time when Park Avenue was still known as Fourth Avenue, and a partially covered train tunnel funneled pollutants and noise up to the street through vents in the center of the roadway. As a result, residential development was sparse until the early 20th century, making this charming 1880s Queen Anne, the only one left of the row and designed by a significant American architect, a physical reminder of Park Avenue’s fascinating past and its link to New York City’s transportation history.

While we are glad to see this house receive some tender care on the front façade, it would be difficult for HDC to find any justification for approving most aspects of the proposed design. The application calls for adding an enormous amount of bulk to the rear, but then takes the gesture even further with the proposed rooftop bulk, which would destroy the effect of the gabled roofline and stick out like a sore thumb. Such a transformation, which might be expected outside of a historic district, would be grossly inappropriate for this building and for its context. We also note that the proposed front door is altogether too contemporary for the style of the house. We implore the Commission today to exercise its right to reject proposals that disrespect our historic districts.

890 Park rear ugly hell view

890 Park Ave existing

890 Park Ave proposed

LPC Determination: No Action

 

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Free Info Session for Preservation Grants: NYC – 2/5

Posted by on Friday, January 29, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

FROM:                  Preservation League of New York State

44 Central Avenue

Albany NY  12206-3002

www.preservenys.org

 

CONTACTS:        Colleen M. Ryan, Director of Communications

518-462-5658, ext. 17

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

Free Info Session for Preservation Grants: NYC – 2/5

Applications due by 4/11/16 for League’s Signature Grant Programs

 

ALBANY, January 25, 2016 – Not-for-profit groups and municipalities are invited to attend a free information session on Preserve New York and Technical Assistance Grants (TAG), the signature grant programs of the Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA).

 

The meeting will be held on Friday, Feb. 5 from 12 noon to 1:00 p.m. at the Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street in New York. Erin Tobin, the League’s Director of Preservation, will explain the requirements of the grants, the process of applying, and discuss some successful previous applicants. Hosted by the Neighborhood Preservation Center and co-sponsored by the Historic Districts Council, this program will include a presentation by Kristin Herron, Arts Program Director for Architecture + Design at NYSCA, who will briefly review funding opportunities for General Operating and Project Support for Fiscal Year 2017. Reservations are required, and seating is limited for this brown-bag lunch event. Please call (212) 228-2781 or email npc@neighborhoodpreservationcenter.org to register.

 

A total of $265,128 available in 2016. This includes $255,128 in funding from NYSCA and $10,000 from the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor for the TAG program. The League will disburse this amount over two grant rounds, Preserve New York and TAG in the spring, and an additional TAG funding round in the fall.

 

“Through its grant programs, the League has strategically invested in the rehabilitation of historic places, leveraged significant additional cash and in-kind resources, and protected properties at the local, state and national level through landmark designations,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “These grants help the League’s growing constituency conserve, protect and use their cultural resources, and are an important catalyst in realizing community preservation goals.”

 

The application deadline for Spring TAG and 2016 Preserve New York is Monday, April 11. Guidelines for grants are posted on the League’s website at www.preservenys.org. Prospective applicants must discuss proposed projects with Preservation League staff before receiving an application. If you are unable to attend the meeting, you may contact Erin Tobin at 518-462-5658 x 12 for more information or to request an application.

 

Since 1993, Preserve New York has provided support for historic structure reports, cultural landscape reports and cultural resource surveys. In 2016, the program will also offer grants for building condition reports. The Preservation League especially encourages projects that advance the preservation of neighborhoods and downtowns that qualify for the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit programs; continue the use of historic buildings such as museums, opera houses, theaters, and libraries for cultural, interpretive, and artistic purposes; and identify and preserve architecture and landscapes designed after World War II. Preserve New York grants are likely to range between $3,000 and $15,000.

 

The League launched the Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) program in 2012 to support projects that preserve New York State’s cultural and historic resources. Not-for-profit arts/cultural groups and municipalities managing arts/cultural facilities are encouraged to apply. The applicant group may apply for short-term, standalone projects that advance the preservation of historic sites, museums, opera houses and theaters, arts facilities and other culturally important institutions that are located in historic buildings and structures that are open to the public. These professional studies include: building conditions surveys, engineering/structural analyses, feasibility/reuse studies and specialized building conservation studies. Preparation of architectural plans and specifications are not eligible. TAG funding will not exceed $3,000 and the total cost of the applicant’s project may not exceed $3,500. Each applicant must provide $500 toward the total project cost.

 

The Preservation League invests in people and projects that champion the essential role of preservation in community revitalization, sustainable economic growth, and the protection of our historic buildings and landscapes. It leads advocacy, economic development and education programs across New York State.

 

The Preserve New York Grant and Technical Assistance Grant programs are made possible through funding from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 

For a list of previous grant recipients, visit the League’s website at www.preservenys.org.

Category: Event, Program & Events · Tags:

Annual Preservation Conference ‘Preservation and the Progressive Agenda’

Posted by on Friday, January 29, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

Keynote Speech and Opening Night Reception, March 4, 2016 | Conference Panels, March  5, 2016

HDC_2016Conf-Graphic-640

HDC_2016Conf-Postcard-back-crop

 

Friends / Students / Seniors $30 – General Admission $40

Click here to register 

 

Friends / Seniors $25 -General Admission $35 – Students Free

Click here to register 

 

 

Category: conference, Featured, Program & Events · Tags:

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