HDC@LPC – February 10, 2015

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

 

ITEM 4

920 Broadway – Ladies’ Mile Historic District

165207- Block 849, lot 63, Zoned M1-5M

Community District 5, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A neo-Renaissance style store and loft building designed by Schwartz & Gross, and built in 1917. Application is to install new storefront infill, signage and banner poles.

920 Bway-2-crop

HDC generally finds the proposed signage to be appropriate, though pin lettering would be far less obtrusive than the large square sign over the entrance. Our committee also found the bracket sign right next to the entrance to be redundant, given the sign above the door. We also ask that all options be considered in order to avoid covering any of the extant leaded glass.

LPC DETERMINATION: APPROVED WITH MODIFICATIONS

 

ITEM 5

3 East 57th Street – Individual Landmark

161175- Block 1293, lot 5, Zoned C5-3

Community District 5, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

An Art Deco style retail building designed by Shreve Lamb and Harmon and built in 1929-30.  Application is to install new storefront infill and alter the base of the building.

3 East 57th Street-1-crop

3 East 57th Street-4-crop

Though unfortunately lost, this building’s original ornate, bronze-framed storefront was one of the finest in the city. The present storefront leaves much to be desired, but it at least maintains and respects the color palette of the rest of the building. HDC finds the proposed design to stray too far from the storefront’s intended contribution to the streetscape, taking the building in the wrong direction. We would much prefer to see a design that uses the original Art Deco storefront as inspiration, creating an elegant future by honoring its past. However, the proposal seeks to clad the storefront in a flat white marble, which would starkly contrast the dark palette of the floors above. At the very least, HDC would suggest that options be explored to keep the sides of the storefront a darker color to maintain continuity from the upper floors to the base. It would be a shame for the building to lose its monumental verticality, a signature style for Shreve, Lamb & Harmon.

LPC DETERMINATION: NO ACTION

 

ITEM 6

1271 Avenue of the Americas – Interior Landmark

165624- Block 1003, lot 29, Zoned C6-6.5, C5-3

Community District 5, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

An International style commercial skyscraper ground-floor lobby, designed by Harrison & Abramowitz & Harris and built in 1956-60. Application is to restore a passageway; remove walls; relocate an entry; replace doors, elevator turnstiles, terrazzo flooring and glass ceiling panels; and install reception desks, lighting, sprinklers and security cameras.

1271 Avenue of the Americas-1-crop

1271 Avenue of the Americas-2-crop

HDC applauds this sensitive restoration project, which includes the replacement in-kind of terrazzo floors and glass ceiling panels. We thank the applicant for their thoughtful approach to this very distinguished – and deserving – Modern interior.

LPC DETERMINATION: APPROVED

 

 

Landmarks @ 50 Honoring Our Past Imagining Our Future- 2015 Conference Tours

Historic District Council

2015 Annual Preservation Conference Series

Landmarks at 50: Honoring Our Past, Imagining Our Future

March 2015

 

Brooklyn Army Terminal: A Public Institution Transformed

Saturday, March 7, 2015, 12PM

BAT-Atrium_Rail-Line

Once the largest military supply base in the United States, Sunset Park’s Brooklyn Army Terminal has transformed over the past 30 years from a campus of warehouses, offices, piers, and docks to a vibrant commercial hub, home to local artisans, manufacturers and cultural institutions. Designed by Cass Gilbert and completed in 1919, the Terminal’s Building B and its 52 acres of floor space was once the largest concrete structure in the world. Join guide Andrew Gustafson as we tour the massive complex, view the spectacular atrium of Building B and highlight the use, preservation and reuse of this former bustling hub of military industry as a new commercial center and part of the revitalized Brooklyn waterfront.

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour: Brooklyn Army Terminal


 

East Harlem Histories

Saturday, March 14, 2015, 1PM

IMG_2392

As East Harlem, also known as “El Barrio” or “Spanish Harlem,” transitions into becoming known as “SpaHa,” this tour will focus on some of the neighborhood’s diverse cultural and ethnic past. Join urban historian Justin Ferate to view delightful architectural treasures and cultural landmarks reflecting the neighborhood’s varied histories –from recent years and from generations past. Over its long history, East Harlem has been home to Cuban, Italian, Puerto Rican, African American, Jewish, Irish, Dutch, English, German, Haitian, Dominican, West African, Salvadoran, Greek and Mexican cultures – among others. Each group has left imprints on the community, but some of East Harlem’s touchstones are potentially endangered in the current reinvention of the neighborhood. Discover handsome civic structures such as the rustic brownstone Park Avenue Viaduct, the impressive Harlem Courthouse and religious edifices  Learn of important cultural treasures, contemporary housing and vest-pocket parks created by Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project. View enterprises such as the Julia de Burgos Latino Cultural Center. Learn of people associated with East Harlem such as Langston Hughes, Piri Thomas, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Vito Marcantonio, Paul Robeson, Fiorello LaGuardia, Manny Vega, Al Pacino, James de la Vega, and Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour:East Harlem Histories



 

 

Village Institutions

Saturday, March 21, 2015, 11AM

Public Theater

Over the years, Greenwich Village has attracted an evolving roster of cultural and philanthropic organizations. Join architectural historian Matt Postal for a walking tour that considers the unique structures that these groups commissioned and ways in which these distinguished historic buildings have been thoughtfully adapted to contemporary purposes. Of particular interest will be the pioneering work of architect Giorgio Cavaglieri, who during the 1960s breathed new life into both the Astor Library (1853-81) and the Jefferson Market Courthouse (1874-77). Participants will learn about the history of these institutions and how specific structures have been preserved and re-imagined as schools, libraries, residences and performing art centers. Likely stops include Public School 16 (begun 1869), the Village Community Church (1847), the Mercantile Library (1890) and the original Whitney Museum of American Art (1838/1931).

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour: 2015 Conference Tour: Village Institutions



 

Classical Culture at Carnegie Hall

Saturday, March 28, 2015 11AM

Carnegie

Skip the practice and get to Carnegie Hall with the Historic Districts Council! Arguably the most famous performance venue in the world, Carnegie Hall is an architectural gem inside and out. Designed by William Burnett Tuthill and completed in 1891, the building was funded by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie as part of his massive cultural endeavors. Join Carnegie Hall historians to tour the heart of this cultural icon, the iconic Isaac Stern Auditorium, home to world class music since the 19th century and named after the famous violinist whose efforts worked to save the building from demolition in the 1960s. We will also peek into the beautiful and newly created Resnick Educational Wing, home to the Weill Music Institute’s diverse educational programming.

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour: Carnegie Hall



 

DUMBO and Fulton Ferry

Saturday, April 11, 2015, 11AM

5-7 Front street

When the Fulton Ferry Historic District was designated in 1977, the small district, with its 15 buildings of mostly low-scale commercial and residential structures, recognized not only classic mid-19th century architecture, but also the pivotal part this area played in the early development of Brooklyn. Exactly 30 years later in 2007, Fulton Ferry’s neighbor DUMBO was designated, recognizing one of New York City’s most significant surviving industrial waterfront neighborhood. In contrast to Fulton Ferry, DUMBO consists of over 90 buildings, most of which were heroically-proportioned manufacturing structures and warehouses, epitomizing the late-19th- and early-20th-century industrial character of the Brooklyn waterfront. Join HDC board member and Director of the DUMBO Neighborhood Alliance Doreen Gallo for a walking tour of these diverse adjacent neighborhoods and a discussion of the current battles to maintain their historic integrity.

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour: DUMBO and Fulton Ferry



 

Preserving West Chelsea

Saturday April 18, 2015, 11AM

Auto showrooms  on West 26th Street2

Between 1970 and 2009, three small but significant historic districts were designated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in West Chelsea.  Led by architectural historian Matt Postal, participants will walk through each district, tracing their shared history and evolution. While the Chelsea Historic District (and its extension) emphasized rows of fine-looking brick town houses and religious buildings that stood on property that was once owned by scholar and real estate developer Clement Clarke Moore, the later districts contain structures connected to the abolitionist movement and the Civil War, as well as the Hudson River’s evolution into a major mercantile center at the start of the 20th century. Highlights will include Cushman Row (1840), the General Theological Seminary (1838-1900), Empire Diner (1943), R.C. Williams Warehouse (1927-28), and a segment of the former New York Central Freight Railway (1929-34) now better known as the High Line.

Friend- $10

General- $20


2015 Conference Tour: Preserving West Chelsea



 

 

 Click here for information about the Keynote and Reception

 

and the Conference Panels 

 

 

The title “Landmarks at 50: Honoring Our Past, Imagining Our Future” was created by Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, Chair of the NYC Landmarks 50 Alliance, and is used with permission.

Support is provided in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Additional support is provided by City Councilmembers Margaret Chin, Inez Dickens, Matthieu Eugene, Daniel Garodnick, Vincent Gentile, Corey Johnson, Ben Kallos, Stephen Levin, Mark Levine, and Rosie Mendez.

Six to Celebrate 2015 Party

 

STC_Logo_Web

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFebruary 3: LOCATION CHANGE -Calvary Church  61 Gramercy Park North

Due to the weather our original location for tonight’s party has lost heat. The new location is Calvary Church  61 Gramercy Park North the entrance is on 21st Street. Sorry for the inconvenience hope you can still join us.

Six to Celebrate 2015 Party

For more information and to register go to our Six to Celebrate page here 

HDC@LPC – February 3, 2015

Posted by on Monday, February 2, 2015 · Leave a Comment 

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

 

39-90 44th Street – Sunnyside Gardens Historic District

166450- Block 182, lot 23, Zoned R4

Community District 4, Queens
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A rowhouse designed by Clarence Stein and Henry Wright and built in 1926 Application is to legalize alterations to facade and windows without Landmarks Preservation Commission permits.

39-90 44th Street-1-edited

In general, simplicity of materials and design is most appropriate in Sunnyside Gardens. Our committee found the proposed casement windows to be too fancy and without precedent in this district. Wood six-over-six double hung windows would be more appropriate. We also would prefer an effort that replicates what was there originally, which was most likely wood infill, rather than the brick that was installed.

LPC determination: Approved

 

116 Noble Street – Greenpoint Historic District

163148- Block 2569, lot 20, Zoned R6B

Community District 1, Brooklyn
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A frame building with alterations designed by C.H. Reynolds and built in 1833. Application is to legalize the replacement of a stoop without Landmarks Preservation Commission permits and to alter areaway.

116 Noble Street-4-ed

This building has been the victim of many unfortunate alterations over the years, but small changes like matching the original stoop would go a long way in taking this building in a better direction. We do, however, applaud the installation of bluestone, a good choice of material for the areaway.

LPC determination: Approved

 

10 Jay Street – DUMBO Historic District

165902- Block 1, lot 50, Zoned M1-4/R8AM3-1

Community District 2, Brooklyn
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
An altered American Round Arch style factory building designed by George M. Newhall Engineering Co. and built in 1897-98. Application is to alter the north elevation, demolish rooftop bulkheads, construct rooftop additions, alter ground floor openings, install storefront infill, and modify loading docks and stairs.
10 Jay Street-2-ed

10 Jay Street-12-ed

While HDC applauds the sensitive treatment of the three elevations to be faced in brick, as well as the storefront infill and modifications to the loading docks, we find much to be desired in the proposed north elevation.

10 Jay Street is a muscular building characteristic of the industrial architecture that defines DUMBO. It is this muscular style that draws people to live and work in the area. Given that its Manhattan-facing buildings announce the neighborhood’s prevailing style and presence, the lacy, airy quality of the proposed crystallized glass façade is inappropriate and incompatible with the district’s strong masonry walls. Unfortunately, rather than relating to and respecting its fellow historic factory buildings, the proposed design seems to take its inspiration from a planned construction project just to the west – a glassy building outside the historic district boundaries. With the construction of so many glass buildings in and around DUMBO, it would be a shame to lose one of the protected gems of the district to this same treatment.

Further, as the renderings show, a walkway and green space is planned to the north of the building along the river, which will make the façade visible not only from Manhattan and the bridges, but also from within the neighborhood itself. A masonry façade would be a much more appropriate and sensitive approach as the northern gateway to the DUMBO Historic District.

LPC determination: No Action

 

863 St. Mark’s Avenue – Crown Heights North Historic District

162298- Block 1222, lot 67, Zoned R6

Community District 8, Brooklyn
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A rowhouse built in 2006. Application is to alter the façade and construct rooftop and rear yard additions.
863 St. Marks Ave crop
863 St. Marks Ave (2) crop
The current appearance of 863 St. Mark’s Place is not only insensitive, but a detraction from the elegance that encompasses it. This is a rare case where adding stucco and an additional story helps blend a building into the background, where in this case, it belongs. The proposed color downplays this intervention, while the added story and setback weave it quietly into its neighbors. In the rear of the building, however, the Committee felt that in regards to both materials and design, the current strategy is quite institutional in its approach, and should be revisited in favor of a more residential design.
LPC determination: No Action

 

459 West Broadway – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

162733- Block 515, lot 4, Zoned M1-5A

Community District 2, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A store building designed by John H. Whitenach and built in 1888-89. Application is to construct rooftop additions.
459 West Broadway-2-ed
Our committee had trouble discerning the visibility of the proposed addition from the drawings provided. While a building of this height could handle a small addition on its roof, we would prefer that the height be brought down to reduce its impact.
LPC determination: Approved

 

53 Wooster Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

163850- Block 475, lot 17, Zoned M1-5B

Community District 2, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A dwelling constructed c. 1825 and altered in 1870. Application is to construct a rooftop addition and alter the rear façade.
53 Wooster Street-2-ed
Our committee had a hard time discerning the proposed addition’s visibility. HDC simply asks that the rooftop addition be set back in such a way that it recedes from view so to better respect this very old building.
LPC determination: Approved

 

16 West 12th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

166407- Block 575, lot 44, Zoned R6

Community District 2, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A townhouse built in 1845-46 and altered in the early 20th century. Application is to reconstruct and alter the front façade.
While the existing central door is not in its original position, our committee finds the existing door with sidelight configuration to be more appropriate in this context. We, therefore, ask that the door be retained or replaced in kind.
LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

100 Greenwich Avenue – Greenwich Village Historic District

161290- Block 617, lot 31, Zoned C1-6

Community District 2, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A Greek Revival style rowhouse built in 1836-37. Application is to construct a rooftop addition.
100 Greenwich Avenue-2-ed
100 Greenwich Avenue is described in the district’s designation report as “the most charming of the row, and closest to its original appearance.” The small-scale proportions of the house do not lend themselves well to a large addition, whose visibility would interrupt the continuous cornice that unifies numbers 96-100 Greenwich Avenue, a feature that is also called out in the designation report. Our committee observed that the height of the addition could be brought down, especially by taking fuller advantage of the roof slope in the rear.
LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

7 East 19th Street – Ladies’ Mile Historic District

165478- Block 848, lot 7, Zoned M1-5B

Community District 4, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A neo-Grec style store building designed by Thomas R. Jackson and built in 1885-86. Application is to re-create missing masonry features on the front facade and install storefront infill.
MODIFICATION OF USE
A neo-Grec style store building designed by Thomas R. Jackson and built in 1885-86. Application is to request that the Landmarks Preservation Commission issue a report to City Planning Commission relating to an application for an Authorization Persuant to Section 15-20(6) of the Zoning Resolution to permit conversion of commercial space to residential.
7 East 19th Street-1-ed
7 East 19th Street-2-ed
HDC applauds the restoration of this elegant store building, especially the reintroduction of the parapet. We would ask, however, that better quality materials be employed for the execution of this work. For a truly top notch restoration, the use of the building’s original materials, rather than fiberglass, which does not age well, would have a huge impact.
LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

281 Park Avenue – Individual Landmark

166208- Block 877, lot 89, Zoned C6-4A

Community District 5, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A Flemish Revival style institutional building designed by Robert W. Gibson and Edward J.N. Stent and built in 1892-94. Application is to replace ground floor infill and install a barrier free access ramp.
281 Park Avenue South-4-ed
281 Park Avenue South-7-ed
This spectacular building’s original storefront is an integral feature in the overall design and composition of the façades. HDC finds the proposed large panes of glass – which are without the transoms and divisions that fit into the building’s rhythm – to be inappropriate, especially considering the amount of documentation that exists for the design of the original storefront. We ask that the proposed storefront be redesigned to reflect the original and/or in a way that mirrors the building’s ornate style.
LPC determination: No Action

 

187 Lenox Avenue – Mount Morris Park Historic District

165781- Block 1904, lot 31, Zoned R7-2/C1-4

Community District 10, Manhattan
 

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
A Queen Anne style rowhouse built in 1886-87 with later alterations.  Application is to install a commercial storefront and alter the areaway.
HDC finds the proposed storefront to be an appropriate installation on this rowhouse, but asks that the applicant, in carrying out this work, consider repairing the parlor floor and restoring its windows. This work would be hugely beneficial to the building – and the business at the ground level – as well as the overall appearance of the entire row. While the contemporary railings at the areaway are suitable as they descend the ramp, HDC asks that the railing at street level be redesigned to match the other street-level railings on the block.
LAID OVER

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags: , , , , , , ,

E-bulletin- February Full of Fun!

Posted by on Thursday, January 29, 2015 · Leave a Comment 

 In This Issue:
  • 2015 Six to Celebrate Party- February 3
  • Secret Lives Tour:E.R. Butler & Co. Decorative Hardware- February 24
  • United to Save the Frick
 STC_Logo_Web

The 2015 Six to Celebrate!

 Join HDC in celebrating the 2015 Six to Celebrate

 and congratulating the 2014 Six to Celebrate on their accomplishments at the launch party!

Date: February 3,2015

Location: Community Church of New York

40 East 35th Street – New York, NY 10016 

Time: 6:00-8:00 PM

 

http://www.6tocelebrate.org/events/

 

Six to Celebrate identifies six historic New York City neighborhoods or institutions that merit preservation. They will be priorities for HDC’s advocacy and consultation over a yearlong period.

 

Revere Pl Crown Heights North, BrooklynThe architecture of Crown Heights North encompasses an astonishing variety of brownstones, rowhouses, wood frame structures, free-standing mansions and churches. The neighborhood has two historic districts, but despite the community’s best efforts, efforts to broaden the neighborhood’s protected areas have currently stalled. Over the next year, the Crown Heights North Association (CHNA) will focus on reviving their preservation campaign, as well as ensuring that this beautiful neighborhood will continue to have strong advocates for years to come.

 

IMG_2392 East Harlem, ManhattanEast Harlem has a long history of settlement by immigrant populations. In the 1960′s, after a mass migration of Puerto Ricans to East Harlem, the neighborhood acquired the name “El Barrio.” Building on a long tradition in Latin American art, the painting of murals on East Harlem’s tenement buildings became a popular form of expression and storytelling. East Harlem Preservation, Inc., will showcase its neighborhood’s “buildings as canvases” tradition through public awareness and outreach and work to preserve and restore endangered community art.
 33-00_Northern_Boulevard-sm Long Island City, QueensA new preservation group based in Long Island City called +Partners has formed to design, preserve, and catalyze the development of environments and places. Their inaugural project is an ongoing campaign to landmark the Long Island City Clock Tower, a beloved neighborhood anchor. They have recently launched a comprehensive survey of the industrial architecture of Long Island City, with plans to create a publicly-accessible internet resource to guide further preservation efforts.
 159-171john_st1 South Street Seaport, ManhattanThe South Street Seaport is the oldest intact neighborhood in Manhattan. As the nation’s major port for over 100 years, its history is still anchored by the distinct sense of place created by its historic buildings, harbor views and tall ships. The Seaport faces major development pressures from the Howard Hughes Corporation, which would irreversibly and insensitively distort this character. HDC has partnered with Save Our Seaport Coalition (SOS) and Friends of the South Street Seaport (FOSS) to protect this unique district, from the 200-year old mercantile buildings to the Belgian block paving and soaring views of the Brooklyn Bridge.
 E 234th St-crop Woodlawn Heights, The BronxWoodlawn Heights is a small residential neighborhood bordered by Van Cortlandt Park, Woodlawn Cemetery, the Bronx River and Westchester County. This historically Irish enclave is bisected by a bustling commercial thoroughfare that still exhibits its Irish flavor through long-standing small businesses and architectural flourishes like green trim and shamrock details. Current threats include the demolition and replacement of historic homes with out-of-scale and non-contextual development. Formed in 2014, the Women of Woodlawn count historic preservation as fundamental to their mission of enhancing local quality of life. They look forward to exploring and preserving the area’s rich history through education and outreach, encouraging tourism, and fostering good stewardship.

 

 Crocheron House- Emilo Guerra Landmarks under Consideration, CitywideIn November 2014, the Landmarks Preservation Commission announced a plan to remove 96 previously considered sites and properties from its calendar. Although the agency chose not to take immediate action on the plan, there remain over 150 sites under consideration that are unprotected. Over the coming year, HDC will document, publicize and conduct community outreach for these sites to increase public awareness and gather support to move their designations forward, while simultaneously aiding the LPC in managing its backlog.

Support is provided in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Additional support is provided by City Councilmembers Margaret Chin,  Inez Dickens, Matthieu Eugene, Daniel Garodnick, Vincent Gentile, Corey Johnson, Ben Kallos, Stephen Levin, Mark Levine, and Rosie Mendez

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Secret Lives Tour:

E.R. Butler & Co. Decorative Hardware

Tuesday, February 24, 2015, 5:00 PM

 candlesticks

Join HDC for a tour of E.R. Butler & Co.’s beautiful Prince Street building and impressive decorative hardware showrooms.

Behind the doors of many of New York’s most architecturally stunning façades, are equally elegant interiors. E.R. Butler & Co. has been designing, creating and distributing fine architectural hardware and decorative furnishings in the spirit of 19th-century American craft since 1990. Their Manhattan showroom is located in the buildings which were once the home to the legendary Prince Street Works, the silver department of Tiffany & Co. Rhett Butler, founder of E.R. Butler, will guide the tour through the cast iron and brick building on Prince Street and into the showrooms which house an archive of more than 25,000 pieces.

 

$35 for Friends of HDC, students and seniors, $45 for general public

To register, please click here

http://hdc.org/featured/secret-lives-tour-e-r-butler-co-decorative-hardware

If you have any questions, please contact Brigid Harmon at bharmon@hdc.org or 212-614-9107.
The exact meeting location will be emailed to registrants the week prior to the tour. Space is limited.

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Unite to Save the Frick

Unite to Save the Frick is made up of concerned individuals and organizations from New York City, across the U.S. and around the world. We are architects and landscape architects, historians, design professionals, scholars, artists, authors, preservation advocates, art and museum critics, journalists, students, and members of the Frick Collection.

We unite to protect the Frick’s signature ensemble of elements from short-sighted destruction and to advocate for responsible modernization.

One Sunday in October, Unite to Save the Frick visited the Frick Museum’s East 70th Street Garden. As usual, many museum patrons and passersby were stopping to enjoy the serenity of the Russell Page’s garden artistry. When told of the Frick’s plan, people were shocked to learn that the Garden and Pavilion were under threat of destruction. In the video they shared their reactions to the plan.

For more information and to take action and sign the petition, visit UnitetoSavetheFrick.org.

Click here to learn more about the proposed plan for the Frick Museum http://unitetosavethefrick.org/fricksdesctructiveplan/

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Historic Districts Council

  hdc@hdc.org | http://www.hdc.org

212-614-9107

 232 East 11th Street New York, NY 10003

Category: Blog, E-bulletin, Program & Events, Six to Celebrate 2015 · Tags: , , ,

Preservation Trivia Night

Posted by on Thursday, January 22, 2015 · Leave a Comment 

trivia-web

trivia-web2

 

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

At the beautiful and historic Paris Cafe!

index

FREE!!!

RSVP to bharmon@hdc.org

This program is part of NYC Landmarks50 Alliance, the multi-year celebration of  

the 50th anniversary of New York City’s Landmarks Law.   

 

 

 

Category: Event, Program & Events · Tags: , ,

HDC@LPC – January 20, 2015

Posted by on Monday, January 19, 2015 · Leave a Comment 

 

Item 1

111 Ridge Road, aka 234-33 Ridge Road – Douglaston Historic District

162102 – Block 8045, lot 55, Zoned R1-2

Community District 11, Queens

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Colonial Revival style freestanding house designed by Josephine Wright Chapman and built in 1909. Application is to replace entrance infill and windows, modify window openings, and install vents.

111 Ridge Road-2a

111 Ridge Road-3a

We would like to first disclose that the applicant, Mr. Wolfe, serves on HDC’s Board of Advisers.

The proposed changes to this house appear quite sensitive and appropriate overall, and display a clear understanding of the Douglaston vernacular. Our committee only questions the removal of the entrance sidelights, a nice historic feature of the house’s elegant front door that should not be sacrificed.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 3

367 7th Avenue – Park Slope Historic District Extension

165156 – Block 1094, lot 1, Zoned R6-A/C2-4

Community District 6, Brooklyn

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

An altered neo-Grec style rowhouse designed by Robert Dixon and built c. 1884. Application is to install storefront infill, signage, awnings, rooftop mechanical equipment and ductwork

367 7th Ave-1a

367 7th Ave-2a

HDC appreciates the effort taken to respect this rowhouse and garage, and applauds this storefront design, especially the replication of the wood doors.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 5

79 Laight Street – TriBeCa North Historic District

164648- Block 217, lot 7501, Zoned C6-3A, C6-2A

Commmunity District 1, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A utilitarian style warehouse built in 1853. Application is to replace doors.

79 Laight Street-1a

79 Laight Street-3a

The muscular character of this utilitarian storehouse – the oldest storage building in the district – deserves an equally substantial entrance. While some glazing is appropriate on the door, the amount proposed here seems to gussy up the building, creating a too-modern juxtaposition. A simple wood door would be more respectful and more appropriate. In a similar vein, the proposed lighting fixtures appear quite residential in their style, and not to scale with the building. Our committee also questions the installation of not one but two very large cameras above the entrance, and wonders whether a smaller camera installed on the underside of the entrance arch would serve the same purpose without being so heavy handed.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 6

464 Greenwich Street – TriBeCa North Historic District

163991- Block 224, lot 27, Zoned 6-2A/TMU

Community District 1, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A store and loft building designed by Charles S. Clark and built in 1892. Application is to legalize the installation of storefront glazing in non-compliance with Certificate of Appropriateness 10-2766.

464 Greenwich Street-1a

The multi-layered glazing installed on this storefront lends a thickness to the base that is uncharacteristic of this building’s style and age. Our committee felt that the overall aesthetic treatment of the storefront is quite sensitive, but recommends that the applicant should explore other options, such as installing security glazing behind the pre-existing glazing and/or the use of riot glass, which would achieve a similar opacity to what was there without transforming the storefront so dramatically.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 9

260-264 Mulberry Street – Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral – Individual Landmark

164668- Block 509, lot 1, Zoned C6-2

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Gothic Revival style church building built in 1815 and designed by Joseph F. Mangin. Application is to reconstruct windows and install protective glazing, replace brownstone stairs and areaway, and install a barrier-free access ramp.

260-264 Mulberry Street-1a

260-264 Mulberry Street-2a

HDC applauds the restoration of the windows on this very important New York City landmark. Our committee simply asks that all measures be taken to ensure the stained glass will be properly vented. As part of the recent restoration of Grace Church in the Brooklyn Heights Historic District, a fine, stainless steel mesh was installed on the exterior of the stained glass as a protective measure, and it has proven to work very well. Such options should be considered carefully before any work is undertaken.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 10

640 Broadway – NoHo Historic District

165517- Block 522, lot 14, Zoned M1-5B

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Classical Revival style store, loft, and office building designed by DeLemos and Cordes, and built in 1896-97. Application is to construct a rooftop addition.

 

Item 11

640 Broadway – NoHo Historic District

165517- Block 522, lot 14, Zoned M1-5B

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Classical Revival style store, loft, and office building designed by DeLemos and Cordes, and built in 1896-97. Application is to request that the Landmarks Preservation Commission issue a report to the City Planning Commission relating to an application for a Modification of Bulk pursuant to Section 74-712 of the Zoning Resolution.

640 Broadway-4a

640 Broadway-2a

HDC found the rooftop addition to be sufficiently concealed, and feels that it is a fair project in exchange for the planned restorative work. We are glad to see the return of the balustrade, though the drawings were slightly unclear as to what materials would be used, and we ask that all materials be in-kind. For a truly first-class restoration, however, our committee feels that the storefront should not be overlooked, and recommends that the Commission ask for the restoration of the storefront cornice. The entire building would be greatly enhanced by the introduction of a more finely detailed cornice, as this feature is very visible on Broadway.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 12

145 Wooster Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

156847- Block 515, lot 31, Zoned M1-5A

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Renaissance Revival style office building designed by Louis Korn and built in 1896-97. Application is remove metal shutters, install storefront infill and signage.

145 Wooster Street-3a

While the current storefront lacks visual richness, HDC would prefer to see a proposal that takes this building in a better direction toward historic appropriateness. The aluminum frame and large quantity of glazing does not do the building justice. Without a clear example to follow, perhaps neighborhood precedents could be examined to find a more sensitive storefront design.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 13

402 West Broadway – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District Extension

163509- Block 488, lot 22, Zoned M1-5A

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A neo-Grec style store and loft building designed by John B. Snook and built in 1880. Application is to replace storefront infill and modify platforms.

402 W Broadway-1a

Given the quality of the building’s tax photo and the clarity it provides as to what the storefront once looked like, our committee felt that the mullion wall and bulkhead should be restored rather than reinterpreted.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 14

430 Broome Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District Extension

165118- Block 482, lot 7503, Zoned M1-5B

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Queen Anne style store and factory building designed by Julius Kastner and built in 1894-95. Application is to replace storefront infill, alter the façade, and remove basement stairs and areaway ironwork.

430 Broome Street-4a

430 Broome Street-5a

HDC would strongly prefer the applicant’s “Option B,” so as to limit the amount of destruction on the building’s Crosby Street façade. We do recommend, however, two things that could improve the proposed design’s appropriateness. The first would be to keep the areaway ironwork at the southern end of the Crosby Street façade, as its removal would not be necessary under Option B. The second would be to maintain the historic style and size of the storefront cornice. Our committee felt it would blend in better if it wrapped around the storefront, but not extend and protrude out all the way up Crosby Street.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 17

261-263 West 71st Street – West End-Collegiate Historic District Extension

155388- Block 1163, lot 8, Zoned R8B

Community District 7, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A pair of rowhouses originally built in 1886-87, combined and altered to an apartment building sometime between 1939 and 1980. Application is to alter the facade.

261-263 W 71st Street-3a

While our committee felt that the proposed design is an improvement on the current façade, we also felt that an opportunity has been missed to introduce something that is both more aesthetically pleasing and more contextual with its surroundings. Replacing a banal stucco building with a slightly less banal stucco building still leaves the block wanting more.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags: , , , , , ,

Landmarks @ 50 Honoring Our Past Imagining Our Future

Posted by on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 · 2 Comments 

Historic District Council

2015 Annual Preservation Conference Series

Landmarks at 50: Honoring Our Past, Imagining Our Future

March 2015

HDC_printready_postcard1 copy

The 2015 Preservation Conference Series celebrates the milestone 50th anniversary of the New York City Landmarks Law and imagines what preservation might look like in the future. Since 1965, preservation activities have had a tremendous, positive effect on New York City, showing that preservation is neither weepy nostalgia nor dusty museums.  Preservation is active work, which engages diverse communities across the city and both reflects and informs New York’s cultural, political, and economic milieu. Innumerable successes have been won in the last 50 years, but there is still great work to be done.

This year’s Conference will consist of a keynote with an opening reception and three panels presented during the month of March. The opening evening will also include the Citywide Preservation Fair, where local advocates working on specific preservation campaigns will have the opportunity to present their efforts in a publicly engaging way.  The Conference Panels, each presented in a different borough, will feature preservationists, historians, advocates and innovators discussing past efforts, current issues, and future concerns. By presenting the panels in different venues throughout the month, the 2015 Conference Series will connect with a wider and more diverse audience in this landmark anniversary year.

 

Keynote and Opening Reception

March 6, 2015 6:30 pm

The Diana Center at Barnard College

3009 Broadway at 118th Street

Jake-Dobkin Keynote Speaker: Jake Dobkin, co-founder and publisher of Gothamist

Today’s Youth and the Future of Landmarks

Jake Dobkin is a lifelong New Yorker  and the publisher of Gothamist, a city-centric blog that focuses on news, events, food, culture, and other local coverage. He writes the popular “Ask a Native New Yorker” feature, where he offers useful advice on neighborhoods, transit, culture and the ever-important work of interacting with your fellow New Yorkers on a daily basis. He lives in Park Slope with his wife, two kids and parents.

 

Plus the Preservation Fair!


2015 Conference Keynote and Opening Reception



 

Conference Panels

 

5ptz2Barack Obama Slept Here: Recognizing Today’s Sites of Cultural Significance

March 11, 6:30PM

Eldridge Street Synagogue

12 Eldridge Street

Lower East Side

More than simply celebrating architectural merit, New York City’s cultural landmarks proudly declare that History Happened Here! Since the signing of the Landmarks Law, many buildings, both individually and as part of historic districts, have been recognized and protected for their cultural significance to the city. These sites, along with those that are still not officially recognized, speak to the vast history of nation-building, housing, social welfare, the arts, entertainment and all the innumerable aspects of life which New Yorkers have pursued since the city’s founding. Author David Freeland will discuss those cultural sites which have been officially designated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission since 1965. The panelists, including Marie Flageul of 5Pointz, historian Eric K. Washington and Jay Shockley, former senior historian, Research Department, Landmarks Preservation Commission, will then discuss what the recognition and preservation of these places will look like moving forward. In an increasingly diversifying world, how do we best acknowledge and protect the significant places that speak to recently-arrived communities, historically-marginalized groups and emerging cultural movements?

2015 Conference Panel- Barack Obama Slept Here



 

eureka garage (3)Tomorrow’s Yesterdays: Historic Districts of the Future

March 18, 6:30 PM

ShapeShifter Lab

18 Whitwell Place

Gowanus

When Brooklyn Heights was designated the very first New York City historic district in 1965, the architectural styles found there exemplified the types of buildings that the Landmarks Preservation Commission saw as worthy of protection. While protecting classic Federals and grand rowhouses has never gone out of style, over the past 50 years, the question of what types of buildings can be landmarked has slowly been re-examined. Beginning in 1973 with the designation of the SoHo-Cast-Iron District, acceptance has slowly warmed to the potential diversity of historic districts, including with vernacular or industrial buildings. This panel will include a presentation of the evolution of historic districts by architectural historian Francis Morrone, before considering the issues of the present and future.  The panelist,  urban planner Paul Graziano, Gowanus advocate Marlene Donnelly and Ward Dennis,  Columbia University professor and Brooklyn Community Board 1 member, will discuss potential historic districts, technological and bureaucratic  strategies  for looking ahead, and questions such as Can Gowanus ever be designated? and Is there a place for a historic district in suburban Queens?

2015 Conference Panel-Yesterday’s Tomorrows: The Future of Historic Districts



 

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Cocktails at the Post Office: Adaptive Reuse of Public Institutions

March 25, 6:30 PM

MoMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Avenue

Long Island City

New York City possesses a treasure trove of historic institutional buildings of grand character, which add immeasurably to our neighborhoods throughout the boroughs. Unfortunately, as schools, hospitals, libraries, police stations, post offices and military facilities age, require modernization or close, hard questions are raised about the next lives of these local landmarks.  After looking at the history of these buildings and early examples of how some have been preserved and repurposed successfully, the discussion will focus on current and future projects that aim to reinvent these spaces to maintain not only their iconic and landmark facades, but also their valued place as  neighborhood anchors. Dr. Jeffrey Kroessler, HDC board member and historian, will begin the panel with a look at the last 50 years of preservation and reuse before the discussion of the present and future is considered by panelists Joseph Coppola, principal at Dattner Architects, Naomi Hersson-Ringskog , Executive Director of No Longer Empty and David Burney, Pratt Institute Planning and Placemaking Professor. (photo credit: Matt Green)

2015 Conference Panel-Cocktails at the Post Office: Adaptive Reuse and Public Institutions



 Conference Tours

  1. Brooklyn Army Terminal: A Public Institution Transformed-Saturday, March 7, 2015, 12PM
  2. East Harlem Histories- Saturday, March 14, 2015, 1PM
  3. Village Institutions-Saturday, March 21, 2015 11AM
  4. Classical Culture at Carnegie Hall-Saturday, March 28, 2015 11AM
  5. DUMBO and Fulton Ferry-Saturday, April 11, 2015, 11AM
  6. Preserving West Chelsea-Saturday April 18, 2015 11AM

For more information and to register for the tours click here 

 

The title “Landmarks at 50: Honoring Our Past, Imagining Our Future” was  created by Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, Chair of the NYC Landmarks 50 Alliance, and is used with permission.
 
Support is provided in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.  Additional support is provided by City Councilmembers Margaret Chin,  Inez Dickens, Matthieu Eugene, Daniel Garodnick, Vincent Gentile, Corey Johnson, Ben Kallos, Stephen Levin, Mark Levine, and Rosie Mendez

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Landmarks 50

 

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Category: 21st Annual Preservation Conference- Landmarks @ 50, conference, Event, Featured, Gowanus, Historic District, National Register, Special Blog · Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

HDC@LPC – January 6, 2015

Posted by on Monday, January 5, 2015 · 2 Comments 

Item 1

70 Willow Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

16-5466 – Block 224, Lot 16, Zoned R6

Community District 2, Brooklyn

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Greek Revival style residence constructed in 1839. Application is to replace front doors and ironwork, remove sills, strip paint, alter the side and rear facades, excavate the rear yard, install a shed, pool, and paving.

70 Willow Street (5) crop

70 Willow Street (4) crop

HDC does not support this application, which is a renovation, not a restoration. The current approach seems to be a shopping spree for period architectural elements.  HDC found the changes inappropriate simply because of the fact that this is a simple brick house, not a high-style Victorian brownstone as the proposed elements suggest. The loss of the arched entry is regrettable, almost as much as the historic door, which is pictured extant in the 1922 photograph. The end result here is an overly decorated pastiche, when the goal should be an intelligent restoration of style. The purchase of a home like this is not just an acquisition of property, but also an inheritance of history; of culture. To that end, HDC was startled to learn that the porch used and referenced by literary luminary Truman Capote will be demolished. The Committee asks that the rear porch be retained and adapted into this building’s new ownership, and that this proposal be revisited.

 LPC determination: NO ACTION

 

Item 2

45 Remsen Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

16-3782 – Block 247, Lot 7, Zoned R-6 & LH-1

Community District 2, Brooklyn

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

An Italianate style rowhouse built in 1861-1879. Application is alter the rear façade and ell and construct a 3-story deck.

48 Remsen Street (2) crop

HDC welcomes a rear yard deck, but could not concede that the elaborate iron work is appropriate. While the material is quite lovely, of quality, and found in other historic quarters of the country—New Orleans’ Vieux Carre came to mind—the Committee agreed that such a style does not fit in Brooklyn Heights. The applicant provided an example of a historic porch in their presentation, and the Committee strongly suggests following this example. HDC does not object to the new window openings in the el, but wonders if the multi-storied bay is the correct way to address the fenestration.

 LPC determination: APPROVED

 

Item 3

863 St. Marks Avenue – Crown Heights North Historic District

16-2298 – Block 1222, Lot 67, Zoned R6

Community District 8, Brooklyn

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A residential building built in 2006. Application is to alter the facade and construct rooftop and rear yard additions.

863 St. Marks Ave crop

863 St. Marks Ave (2) crop

The current appearance of 863 St. Mark’s Place is not only insensitive, but a detraction from the elegance that encompasses it. This is a rare case where adding stucco and an additional story helps blend a building into the background, where in this case, it belongs. The proposed color downplays this intervention, while the added story and setback weave it quietly into its neighbors. In the rear of the building, however, the Committee felt that in regards to both materials and design, the current strategy should be revisited.

LAID OVER

 

Item 5

41 West 11th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

16-1705– Block 575, Lot 70, Zoned R6

Community District 2, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A Greek Revival style rowhouse built in the mid-1840s. Application is to demolish the
existing rear yard addition and construct rooftop and rear yard additions, install a
pergola and planters at the roof, and modify the areaway.

41 West 11 Street crop

HDC finds the rooftop addition acceptable, as care was taken to conceal its visibility and preserve the low scale experience of West 11th Street. While the proportions of the rear façade are appealing, the Committee resolved that smaller masonry openings on the rear may be a more successful composition and we suggest reducing the amount of glazing.

 LPC determination: APPROVED

 

Item 8

1006 Madison Avenue – Upper East Side Historic District

16-3359 – Block 1392, Lot 58, Zoned C5-1

Community District 8, Manhattan

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

A French Second-Empire style residence designed by G. E. Knowlde and built in 1870,
altered with a two-story commercial extension in the early 20th century. Application
is to replace storefront infill.

1006 Madison (3) crop1006 Madison (2) crop

HDC urges the Commission to deny this application, which will erase one of Madison Avenue’s historic storefronts. In the early twentieth century, Madison Avenue became a retail corridor, with the first and second stories of townhomes transformed into storefronts distinct from the architectural style of their host buildings. 1006 Madison is such a building, as it is sleek and Art Moderne-inspired, yet it rests within a Second Empire residence. To ensure the preservation of these significant 1920s and 1930s storefronts, the Madison Avenue Storefronts Master Plan was created in 1981, and each property’s storefront was assessed and assigned a color. 1006 Madison is delineated as a category red property, the most significant classification in the Plan. A category red assignment requires the retention and restoration of the historic storefront. This proposal seeks to do the contrary, which is to remove this entire storefront. This removal would include its curvilinear glass, literally flattening the flavor of what makes this building and Madison Avenue distinct.

 LPC determination: NO ACTION

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags: , , , , ,

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

Posted by on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS 

FROM

THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

holly

 

 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tour of EverGreene Architectural Arts Studio

 LV

Tour of Loew’s Valencia Theatre

Dear Friend,

2015 marks the 50th Anniversary of New York City’s Landmarks Law. That’s half a century of the City acknowledging that preserving historic buildings and neighborhoods is vital to New York,  but just acknowledging something is not enough.  Since 1970, the Historic Districts Council has worked to ensure that historic preservation remains a strong voice in determining the city’s future. From local concerns to citywide issues, the HDC is the only citywide group working with local neighborhood partners to advocate for our city’s irreplaceable historic buildings. Our efforts have brought success over the decades, but much still remains to be done. Please make an end of year gift now and help us continue our crucial work.

We’ve been busy all year – from a film series in Tribeca to bus tours of Staten Island to talks on historic murals and antebellum swine, it’s almost too much to recount. Two programs we’re really proud of have been our new Preservation School, a new monthly series of talks on topics such as reading architectural drawings and conducting building research that’s been so popular we’re looking at offering additional sessions and our Six to Celebrate tours exploring neighborhoods such as Forest Hills and Madison Square North. We’ve brought people to the former Loew’s Valencia Theatre in Jamaica, Queens and Roosevelt Island, gone on historic pub crawls and sampled authentic 19th-century bitters! In total, we had 20 tours and two dozen other programs attended by over 2,500 participants – and there is more to come in 2015!

Next year promises to be a time of celebration and challenge.  New York City’s Landmarks Law is one of the strongest preservation tools in the country and something which all New Yorkers should be proud of.  The Law has strengthened communities, preserved value, created jobs, and enriched the city for fifty years. HDC will highlight the law which protects our city through events in each of the five boroughs throughout the year.

HDC is able to offer this wide range of events thanks to the

support of our friends. Making a Friendship donation will ensure you receive early notice of and discounts to all of these exciting events. More importantly, your contribution will enable HDC to continue our work safeguarding and supporting all the community efforts which preserve New York. 

 

Happy holidays, and we look forward to seeing you again in 2015!

 

Cheers,

Simeon

 

Simeon Bankoff

Executive Director

Historic Districts Council

 

 

Historic Districts Council

  hdc@hdc.org | http://www.hdc.org

212-614-9107

 232 East 11th Street New York, NY 10003

 

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