HDC@LPC – Testimony for LPC Hearing on March 22, 2016

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

 

Item 2

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Queens

180702 – Block 8051, lot 19

240 Park Lane – Douglaston Historic District

A Tudor Revival style house built c. 1935. Application is to replace windows.

HDC does not approve of destroying original, historic steel casement windows. The existing windows should be either restored or replaced with new steel casement windows to match the original configuration.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

240 Park Lane-b

240 Park Lane-a

 

Item 3

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

178838 – Block 5118, lot 6

1440 Albemarle Road – Prospect Park South Historic District

A Colonial Revival style house designed by Robert Bryson and Charles Pratt and built in 1905. Application is to alter the rear façade and porch, replace siding, and install HVAC units and fencing at the rear yard.

The very reasonable and sensitive interventions proposed here, coupled with the removal of the unfortunate asphalt siding, moves this house in the right direction. HDC would like to commend and thank the applicant for this thoughtful proposal.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

1440 Albemarle Road

 

Item 5

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

175951 – Block 1929, lot 49

215 Lafayette Avenue – Clinton Hill Historic District

A French Second Empire style rowhouse built in 1868-70. Application is to construct a rooftop bulkhead, deck and railings.

The low-rise character of this block renders rooftop bulkheads, like this one, significant interventions that undermine the quality of the street. The roofs on these houses were originally designed to be accessed via scuttles, so stair bulkheads end up looking too alien in their context and, perhaps, should not be allowed. HDC does not object to the railing, but this feature would not be necessary without the bulkhead.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

215 Lafayette-b

215 Lafayette-a

 

Item 7

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

180159 – Block 321, lot 74

165 Degraw Street – Cobble Hill Historic District

An Italianate style rowhouse built in 1853-54. Application is to construct a rear yard addition and install lot line windows.

While HDC is glad to see the present addition removed, we feel that the proposed bulk could be reduced to lessen the burden into the rear yard. Perhaps the top two floors, whose three-bay configuration is quite nice, could be kept at the rear’s original plane instead.

LPC determination: Approved

165 Degraw-a

165 Degraw-b

 

Item 8

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

172512 – Block 323, lot 13

469 Henry Street – Cobble Hill Historic District

An Italianate style rowhouse built in the early 1850’s. Application is to construct a rear extension and rooftop bulkhead, and to demolish a shed.

While there are a few additions on this block that are of comparable heights to the one proposed here, it is not the predominant height of additions on this block. HDC finds that this addition would move the block in a direction in which such an incursion becomes normative, thus allowing for future enlargements of this size. The addition pays little attention to its neighbors on either side, and there is no precedent for the amount of glass proposed in the rear. HDC also objects to the visibility of the bulkhead from Strong Place.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

469 Henry-b

 

Item 9

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

178243 – Block 1222, lot 1

839 St. Marks Avenue – Crown Heights North Historic District

A High Victorian Gothic style freestanding mansion designed by Russell Sturgis and built in 1870. Application is to alter the facades, demolish an addition, and construct a new connecting building on the lot.

This is a rare freestanding mansion in Crown Heights North, which, between roughly 1890 and 1920 was host to many grand mansions, which were largely concentrated on St. Mark’s Avenue. The avenue was such a prominent address that the broader neighborhood was briefly called the “St. Mark’s District.” While most of the freestanding mansions were demolished to make way for middle class housing with the arrival of the subway in the early 20th century, number 839 survives, described in the designation report as “one of the oldest and most important 19th century mansions remaining in the Crown Heights North district.” It is with awareness of this history that HDC approaches this application, which inarguably represents a major change to the character of the building and its context. We feel that more effort should be made to respect the mansion, especially on the St. Mark’s Avenue side, where more bulk should be sacrificed and setback to retain and honor the mansion’s freestanding orientation and allow for some breathing space.

LPC determination: No Action

839 St. Marks Ave-a

839 St. Marks Ave-d

 

Item 12

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

181149 – Block 1222, lot 40

120 Kingston Avenue – Crown Heights North Historic District

A Renaissance Revival style flats building designed by Axel Hedman and built c. 1900-02 with a streamlined style storefront added in the mid 20th century. Application is to request that the Landmarks Preservation Commission issue a report to the City Planning Commission relating to an application for a Modification of Use pursuant to Section 74-711 of the Zoning Resolution.

While we do not have comments about the change in use before you today, HDC would like to take this opportunity to thank both the applicant and the Commission for the sensitive restoration of this storefront, which includes colored and curved glass, stainless steel ribbing and neon signage. Our committee looks forward to raising a glass in the new Kingston Lounge!

LPC determination: Approved

120 Kingston Avenue

 

Item 13

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Brooklyn

181057 – Block 1222, lot 34

1290 Bergen Street – Crown Heights North Historic District

A Renaissance Revival style rowhouse designed by F.K. Taylor and built c. 1898. Application is to construct a rooftop bulkhead and modify masonry openings.

Much like 215 Lafayette Avenue in Clinton Hill, heard earlier in the day, and 120 Bainbridge Street in Stuyvestant Heights, heard on February 2nd, this rooftop bulkhead is unfortunately proposed for a location where it would be highly visible from multiple angles. Some houses in some areas, like this one, simply cannot accommodate bulkheads without disrupting the continuity and pristine quality of the street. HDC feels that alternative roof access should be investigated in such situations, such as the insertion of a scuttle on the roof.

LPC determination: Approved

1290 Bergen Street

 

Item 15

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

175881 – Block 1234, lot 19

225 West 86th Street – Individual Landmark

An Italian Renaissance style apartment building designed by Hiss and Weekes and built in 1908-1909. Application is to install rooftop mechanical equipment.

Running new pipes through a building is a major undertaking, despite where the boiler system is placed, so HDC finds it difficult to understand why the placement of the new boiler system on the roof would be less disruptive than running the pipes from the basement. The installation of more visible equipment on the roof should be avoided if at all possible.

LPC determination: Approved

225 West 86th Street-existing

225 West 86th Street-proposal

 

Item 23

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

181685 – Block 73, lot 11

95 Marginal Street – South Street Seaport Historic District

A neo-Classical style market building designed by the Berlin Construction Company, built in 1907, and rebuilt by Wank Adams Slavin Associates in 1995. Application is to dismantle, relocate, reconstruct and alter the building.

While HDC finds this proposal to be sensitive overall, and appreciates the care being taken to honor the Tin Building, we question the applicant’s strategy of presenting a segmented plan for a much larger scheme in the South Street Seaport. We urge the Commission to look ahead and consider the broader goals of this project and their impact on the historic district.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

95 Marginal Street-Tin Building

 

 

Urban Vanguard Tour of Uber

It’s the perfect setting for the Urban Vanguard’s next event.

UBER_CIRCLE_REV

Uber chose to locate in the Terminal Warehouse, a mammoth structure in the West Chelsea Historic District that was once home to the famous 1990s Tunnel Nightclub.

2016-03-04 -- Terminal Warehouse

We’ll meet up in the lobby, explore the historic building, head upstairs to tour Uber’s offices, and share a few drinks with their staff.

And one more thing:

Anita

 

We’ll finish things up with a rare live performance by Urban Vanguard member Anita Antoinette of NBC’s The Voice!

To register click here !

 

Final UV Logo

 

ZQA/MIH vote this Thursday

Send City Council one last letter before they vote: New Yorkers deserve affordable housing without upzoning the entire city. They have the power to make these decisions, but need to hear from YOU.

Who: NYC City Council

What: Vote on Zoning for Quality & Affordability (ZQA); Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH)

Where: City Hall, Committee Room (Manhattan)

When: Thursday, March 17, 10:00 am 

City Council’s Subcommittee on Zoning & Franchises will vote on ZQA/MIH this Thursday at City Hall. The committee meeting is open to the public–join and listen to Councilmembers’ final phases of deliberation before this plan moves to full Council for a final vote before the end of March, 2016.

HDC testified in opposition at City Council’s public hearings in February, and we weren’t alone. The majority of dismay toward ZQA and its sibling, Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH) were from community boards city-wide, where there was disapproval across the boards, including strong opposition from 4 of the 5 Borough Boards. The majority of community boards across the city (including all of the boards in the Bronx) voted against ZQA/MIH DESPITE the Mayor’s promise of increasing housing affordability. Despite this opposition, ZQA/MIH has moved forward with several adjustments.

HDC thanks the Council for its consideration of widespread concerns that were risen at public hearings. de Blasio and City Council have acquiesced some, but certainly not all, of the controversies of ZQA/MIH. Thus far, some changes made are as follows: affordability brackets have been adjusted to decrease income requirements for housing, responding to Comptroller Stringer’s analysis of East New York which found that MIH would actually accelerate and increase displacement there, rather than house New Yorkers. Senior housing was also increased by 50 square feet per unit, and Manhattan below Harlem will now be exempt from a proposed five foot increase, while Upper Manhattan and all other boroughs will still see this small, yet impacting, height increase. This is substantial, as many outer borough neighborhoods that lack historic district designation, but enjoy contextual zoning, will be at risk due to this increase.

The income adjustments are certainly more inclusionary of low-incomes, but HDC remains concerned with upzonings so massive that they are on par with urban renewal. We reiterate our stance that finding a solution for housing in New York should not be synonymous with high-density and private, market-rate development. HDC also is deeply concerned about the impact of ZQA/MIH on the existing people and places that upzoning will affect, which is why we are actively working with Preserve East New York.

Send one final letter to City Council’s Land Use Committee before the vote on Thursday. To send, please click here.

Category: E-bulletin · Tags:

Annual Preservation Conference ‘Preservation and the Progressive Agenda’-2016

Posted by on Monday, March 14, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

Keynote Speech and Opening Night Reception, March 4, 2016 | Conference Panels, March  5, 2016

HDC-ConferenceProgram2016_Web-Cover

Keynote Speech and Opening Night Reception, March 4 at 6 pm

Thurgood Marshall Federal Courthouse, 40 Foley Square

Friends | Students | Seniors $30

General Admission $40

 

Please be aware that this is a United States District Court building and has several security measures. You will need photo identification and will have to pass through security, so please allow extra time.  Phones will be checked at security and returned upon leaving. We thank you for your understating and patience.  


Conference Panels, March  5 

New York Law School, 185 West Broadway 

Friends | Seniors $25

General Admission $35

Students Free

 


Conference Walking Tours 

Friends | Student | Seniors – $10

General Public- $20

 

NYSCA-NYCulture-CityCouncil-logos

Category: conference, Program & Events · Tags:

BHM-Addisleigh Park Historic District-

Posted by on Monday, March 14, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

The Historic Districts Council is celebrating Black History Month by showcasing Addisleigh Park !

Addisleigh Park

The Addisleigh Park historic district is a suburban-type enclave in southeast Queens with a rich and distinctive history. The neighborhood of approximately 650 homes Addisleigh Park was largely developed in the 1930’s as part of the pre-World War II building boom that shaped large swaths of eastern Queens. Architecturally, the buildings are remarkably intact with few examples of inappropriate alterations or teardowns. Built when race-restricted covenants dictated the segregation of the city’s neighborhoods, Addisleigh Park eventually transformed from an exclusively white neighborhood into one of New York City’s premier African-American enclaves by the early 1950’s. The area would eventually become home to notables such as Count Basie, Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, Illinois Jacquet, Jackie Robinson, James Brown, Joe Louis, Milt Hinton, Roy Campanella, Percy Sutton, Cootie Williams and many others. Designated February 1,2011

179-07 Murdock Avenue, Ella FitzgeraldTitle: 179-07 Murdock Avenue, Ella Fitzgerald’s house

Borough: Queens

Historic District: Addisleigh Park

Keywords: Ella Fitzgerald, residential, shingles, ashlar

Description: 179-07 Murdock Avenue, Ella Fitzgerald’s house

Designated as part of the Addisleigh Park HDC February 1, 2011: Designation Report 

For more information and images about Addisleigh Park click here

To make an appointment to view all images from this historic district, please e-mail hdc@hdc.org

or call (212) 614-9107.

Back To Queens-Landmarks

Category: Historic District · Tags: , ,

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer to deliver Keynote Address

Posted by on Monday, March 14, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

22nd Annual Preservation Conference-Thurgood Marshall Courthouse, Friday, March 4,  6:00 pm

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer will deliver the keynote address at the Historic Districts Council’s 2016 Annual Preservation Conference, “Preservation and the Progressive Agenda: Framing the Conversation.”

As a leader in New York City’s civic affairs and a longtime participant in the fight to protect historic neighborhoods and places, Ms. Brewer will share her insight on current issues and trends in land use planning and policy.

Join us at the beautiful Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse, 40 Foley Square on Friday, March 4, at 6:00 pm. The keynote will be followed by a reception and mingling in the building’s magnificent lobby.

See Below For More Information or click here to read the brochure 

Keynote Speech and Opening Night Reception, March 4 at 6 pm

Thurgood Marshall Federal Courthouse, 40 Foley Square

Friends | Students | Seniors $30

General Admission $40

Click here to register 

~Please be aware that this is a United States District Court building and has several security measures. You will need photo identification and will have to pass through security, so please allow extra time.  Phones will be checked at security and returned upon leaving. We thank you for your understating and patience.~


Conference Panels, March  5 

New York Law School, 185 West Broadway 

Friends | Seniors $25

General Admission $35

Students Free

Click here to register 


Conference Walking Tours 

Friends | Student | Seniors – $10

General Public- $20

Click here to register 

NYSCA-NYCulture-CityCouncil-logos

Category: conference, Program & Events · Tags:

HDC@LPC – Testimony for LPC Hearing on March 15, 2016

Posted by on Monday, March 14, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

HDC regularly reviews every public proposal affecting Individual Landmarks and buildings within Historic Districts in New York City, and when needed, we comment on them. Our testimony for the latest items to be presented at the Landmarks Preservation Commission is below.

 

Item 2

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

175795 – Block 519, lot 61-

31 Charlton Street – Charlton-King-Vandam Historic District

A Federal style house built in 1826. Application is to modify masonry openings and the front areaway, construct a rear addition, and excavate the rear yard.

It seems clear that there is an attempt here to turn this very old building into something it’s not by destroying all but the front façade – and even that would not be spared entirely in this proposal. The adjustment of the interior floor heights would mean altering the placement of the windows, leaving the front façade with something akin to bad and unnecessary plastic surgery. Further, the varied window levels on the block provide no evidence that this building needs any adjustments to fit in. Concerning the rest of the house, it seems that the unfortunate alterations to the building’s neighbors on either side are being used as justification or precedent for its proposed treatment, when this building should instead be spared the same fate. HDC asks that at least the top floor of the rear be preserved to keep some record of the original configuration, and that any excavation be undertaken with utmost care for the fragility of this building and the row.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

31 Charlton-a

31 Charlton-b

 

Item 4

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

175659 – Block 573, lot 43-

24 Fifth Avenue – Greenwich Village Historic District

A Spanish Renaissance style apartment building designed by Emery Roth and built in 1926. Application is to install awnings, lighting, and signage.

HDC finds that the proposed awnings, which neither match the ones on the other side of the entrance nor the historic awnings found on this building, only emphasize the asymmetry of the ground floor ensemble. Considering that the proposed awnings do not serve a function other than to display the business name, HDC finds that signage, along with the proposed lanterns, would be preferable.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

24 Fifth Avenue

 

Item 7

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

160525 – Block 574, lot 31-

26 West 11th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

A Greek Revival style townhouse built in 1844-45. Application is to modify the front entrance.

HDC finds the removal of the entrance vestibule to be appropriate. However, the new brownstone enframement leaves the window above looking a bit squished. We would suggest that the applicant work with LPC staff to adjust the proportions or remove the enframement’s upper piece of masonry to allow for the retention of the window sill and a bit of flat wall in between the door’s cornice and the window.

LPC determination: Approved

26 West 11th Street-existing

26 West 11th Street-proposed

 

Item 8

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

178827 – Block 529, lot 52-

21 Bleecker Street – NoHo East Historic District

A pair of combined Federal style converted dwellings originally built in 1830, and altered in the 1860s with Italianate style features. Application is to install storefront infill.

This structure is comprised of two buildings with three distinct storefront bays, a charming and irregular ensemble. The proposed scheme would regularize the storefront, introducing heavy framing and resulting in a loss of the existing rhythm – and charm. HDC finds that if the fully glazed storefront is to be retained at the base of the building, it would be better to keep the existing rhythm of multiple entrances separated by windows. This would better honor the historic storefront configuration, as well as avoid issues like the awkward window proportions on the proposed scheme, where the western bay’s windows are slightly more narrow than those on the eastern bay.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

21 Bleecker Street

21 Bleecker Street-proposed

 

Item 9

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

181687 – Block 499, lot 7-

104-110 Greene Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

A store and office building with Classical style details designed by William Dilthey and built in 1908. Application is to install new doors, signage, display vitrines and lighting.

While HDC finds the proposed doors and signage to be appropriate, we urge the Commission to deny the proposed vitrine windows. This brick building features a faux rusticated base and a consistently symmetrical scheme throughout. Not only would it be a shame to punch holes into the masonry, detracting from the solidity of the building’s base, but the windows would mar the symmetry of the ground floor, and, in fact, the entire building.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

104-110 Greene Street

 

Item 10

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

178798 – Block 513, lot 25-

163 Mercer Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

A stable, wagon house and storage building designed by G. Van Nostrand and built in 1867 and altered in 1948. Application is to remove vinyl signage installed without Landmarks Preservation Commission permits, paint the façade, alter masonry openings, replace doors and windows, install signage, and install a ramp.

HDC asks that the applicant investigate a more neutral paint color for the façade, since the proposed white would be a stark contrast to the black trim. HDC feels that this building would fit in better if the color were more muted, especially given the minimalist character of the proposed new infill.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

163 Mercer Street

 

Item 12

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

181954 – Block 514, lot 1-

134 Wooster Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

A one-story garage built in 1946-1947. Application is to demolish the existing building and construct a new building.

HDC feels that the design of this new building channels Modern architecture, like that of Lincoln Center, more than the cast-iron vocabulary of SoHo. Our committee was concerned about the proposal, as the drawings show few details for what the façade would actually look like, but take issue with the proposed color scheme, which is in stark contrast to the neighboring buildings. HDC also questions the proposed height of the penthouse at 15 feet 8 inches, which seems extremely tall for a secondary portion of the building.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

134 Wooster Street

134 Wooster Street-proposed

 

Item 16

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

177770 – Block 1374, lot 1-

781 Fifth Avenue – Upper East Side Extension Historic District

A neo-Romanesque and neo-Gothic style hotel building designed by Schultze & Weaver and Buchman & Kahn Associates and built in 1926-27. Application is to install sidewalk planters.

While on first glance these planters did not seem problematic, our committee ultimately felt that planters pushed out to the edge of the curb would be strange, especially in such a heavy pedestrian zone. Typically, planters like these are placed right up against a building. If a security barrier is desired here, masonry bollards, especially ones that are smaller in profile and thus less obstructive, would be preferable.

LPC determination: Approved

781 Fifth Avenue

 

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags: , , , ,

Introducing the Panelists for this year’s Preservation Conference!

Posted by on Monday, February 29, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

Saturday, March 5, 2016

9:00AM to 1:00PM

New York Law School (185 West Broadway, Manhattan)

 

Panel #1: AFFORDABLE HOUSING: HOW IT WORKS WITH HISTORIC PRESERVATION

Ben-Michelle

 

As one of the de Blasio administration’s major priorities, affordable housing is a key focus of present land-use planning and decision-making. The Mayor’s Housing New York plan has been a subject of much debate across communities in all five boroughs since it was unveiled in January 2015. As such, the community of those involved in land use issues, including city agencies, developers, planners and preservationists, have been working to define their various agendas within this political focus. Despite evidence that historic preservation is not at odds with affordable housing policies, some real estate professionals have attempted to pit preservation against affordable housing as a means of slowing the pace of landmark designation in the city. In order to help the preservation community to counter that argument and define its role in this context, panelists Benjamin Dulchin, Executive Director of the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development, and Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of the Fifth Avenue Committee and a New York City Planning Commissioner, will outline some of the facts and engage the audience in a conversation about what affordable housing means in New York City.

 

Panel #2: COMMUNITY PLANNING: A USEFUL TOOL FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION

 

John-Juan Camilo

Though not a new concept, community-based planning – the process by which communities engage with civic leaders and contribute feedback about local concerns to ensure successful urban outcomes – has become popular in recent years. Neighborhoods across the city, from East Midtown to the South Street Seaport, have been engaged in community participation sessions to determine everything from zoning plans to local employment. Described by the New York City Planning Commission as “essential to the city’s vitality,” community-based planning provides a means of addressing a variety of issues by listening to those stakeholders who are most impacted and impactful. Panelists John Shapiro, Chair of Pratt Institute’s Graduate Center for Planning and the Environment, and Juan Camilo Osorio, Director of Research at the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance, will outline the intellectual framework and address the current status of community-based planning efforts in New York City. Given this framework, can planners and preservationists define a model for taking on issues related to the preservation of neighborhood character?

 

REGISTER NOW!

 

Category: conference · Tags: , , ,

Gale Brewer to Keynote HDC’s Annual Preservation Conference!

Posted by on Thursday, February 25, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

TMC-lobby2

Join HDC at the Opening Night of its 22nd Annual Preservation Conference!

 

Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer will deliver the keynote address at this year’s conference, entitled “Preservation and the Progressive Agenda: Framing the Conversation,” on Friday, March 4, at 6:00pm. As a leader in New York City’s civic affairs and a longtime participant in the fight to protect historic neighborhoods and places, Ms. Brewer will share her insight on current issues and trends in land use planning and policy. Immediately following her speech, guests will mingle in the magnificent lobby of the Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse (pictured above), located at 40 Foley Square in Manhattan. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the recently restored courthouse was built in 1932-36 and designed by Cass Gilbert and his son Cass Gilbert, Jr.

Tours of the building will begin at 5:00pm. There is very limited space on these tours. To register, please contact us at 212-614-9107 or hdc@hdc.org.

 

Please be aware that this event takes place in a United States District Court building that has several security measures. You will need to show photo identification and pass through security screening, so please allow extra time. Cell phones will be checked at security and returned upon your departure. We thank you for your understanding and patience, and we promise it’s worth it!

 

* Photo from the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit 

Space is limited; advance registration is encouraged!

REGISTER NOW

Category: conference · Tags:

“Just Because You Can, Does It Mean You Should?”

Posted by on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 · Leave a Comment 

Cocktails and conversation with President Dan Allen and Executive Director Simeon Bankoff

Pavilion interior

Pavilion Theater interior

Thursday, February 11, 2016

The Landmarks Preservation Commission is the official agency which regulates how historic buildings are treated, but the LPC can only regulate the specifics of proposals. What about the choices underlying proposals – in other words, just because something is possible, does it follow that it should be allowed?

With that in mind, how should advocates evaluate the core preservation issues underlying proposals to change historic buildings?

Join the Historic Districts Council for an engaging evening of cocktails and conversation featuring Executive Director Simeon Bankoff and President Daniel Allen.

Mr. Allen, who serves as Principal at CTA Architects, will also present a series of case studies that both test the limits of the Landmarks Law and demonstrate the power of community activism.

This event is full

Category: Program & Events · Tags:

Thanks for Visiting

The Historic Districts Council is the advocate for all of New York City's historic neighborhoods. HDC is the only organization in New York that works directly with people who care about our city's historic neighborhoods and buildings. We represent a constituency of over 500 local community organizations.

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Historic Districts Council
232 East 11th Street
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tel: 212-614-9107
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