150 Years of LGBT History – By the Landmarks Preservation Commission

150 Years of LGBT History

To see the full PDF of this informative and well illustrated document

click here

SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT ON PRESERVATION!

(Why landmarks and historic districts are good for NYC!)

 

FICTION:Too much of the city is off limits to development and construction.

FACT:Only 3.6% of NYC is protected by landmark designation. This means that 96.4% of the city is unrestricted by any landmarks regulation.

FACT: The Landmarks Preservation Commission and its staff spend the vast majority of their time reviewing and approving applications for alterations to landmarks and historic districts. These include the new tower above the Hearst Building and the 1300-plus-foot towers above the Art Students League and Steinway Hall.

 

FICTION:  Landmarking is bad for the construction industry and building trades.

FACT: Preservation and renovation create tens of thousands of good-paying jobs in the construction and building trades. According to Nicholson and Galloway Masonry, Restoration, Roofing, Coppersmithing and Waterproofing, “We are a Union Contracting firm employing over 150 Trades people . . .  . For anyone or any organization to imply that the preservation of historic buildings detracts from jobs in New York could not be further from the truth.” (hdc.org/landmarks-law/help-save-the-landmarks-law-testimonials)

FACT:  Most architectural practices derive the bulk of their income from renovation work.

FACT: In January 2014, the Department Of Buildings processed 7,184 applications, out of which 945, or 13.15% were for work on landmark properties. Since landmarks only represent 3.6% of all NYC properties, applications for work on landmarks should be no more than 3.6% of all applications – instead they are almost four times that. This means that there is more construction activity, more economic activity, and more capital improvement on landmark properties than elsewhere. It also means that landmarked properties generate numerous, good jobs.

FICTION:  Landmark and historic district designation limit affordable housing.

  FACT:  NYC’s historic districts are comprised of thousands of affordable housing units.

FACT:  LPC does not regulate use, so developers are free to create affordable housing in any historic district.

  FACT:With96.4% of NYC unencumbered by preservation regulations,how can preservation be a major barrier to affordable housing?  The hundred-story buildings of “Billionaires Row”  on 57th Street contains no affordable Housing, although they are not in a Historic District.

 

FICTION:  People and businesses want to be in new construction.

FACT:Tech companies, from local startups to branches of West Coast giants like Google, vote with their feet in favor of neighborhoods like Union Square, Flatiron and SoHo – all part of what constitutes Manhattan South. . . .Today’s techies typically prefer proximity to their peers, buildings with character and history….” (CRAIN’S May 13, 2012)

FACT: The most desirable neighborhoods in NYC to live and work in are in our  historic districts; that’s why developers want to build in and adjacent to them.

For additional FACTS about preservation go to http://hdc.org/featured/help-save-the-landmarks-law

Continuing Education Program: Terra Cotta New York-post

The Historic Districts Council is pleased to present the first in a series of continuing education panels which will focus on historic materials. These programs will illuminate the complex histories, manufacturing methods, restoration process and use as a contemporary material. The first program
is

Terra Cotta New York

 

(Former) Loew's Valencia Theatercrop4416779971_5ac0d6a112_z

 

Architectural terra cotta is one of the most prevalent ornamental features in urban environments, and New York City is filled with remarkable examples. The skyline here is rich in terra cotta figures and intricate decorative  detail. This program will present a thorough consideration of varied aspects of this material.

 

Topics to be covered will include an in-depth discussion of the use of terra cotta in historic and modern buildings; the manufacturing of terra cotta for restoration and for new construction and case studies of the restoration and maintenance of these historic buildings. The program will feature four speakers, each an expert in this field.

Speakers are:
Susan Tunick- President, Friends of Terra Cotta and author of Terra-Cotta Skyline.

 

John Krouse- President, Boston Valley Terra Cotta

 

Dan Allen- Principal, CTA Architects

 

Harry Kendall- Principal, BKSK Architects

 

 

*********
Tuesday June 24, 2014
8:30 am-Check in
9:00- 1:00-Program
at the
Neighborhood Preservation Center
232 East 11 Street
New York, NY 10003
Public-$125  
Friends of HDC-$100  
Includes continental breakfast

 *********

 

3.5 AIA Approved LU/HSW Credits/ 3.5 NY State Licensing Credits

 

For more information or to RSVP please contact Brigid Harmon at 212-614-9107 or bharmon@hdc.org

 

 

Pictures of Recent Historic Districts Council Events

Posted by on Monday, June 23, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

 E-BULLETIN OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

June 2014, Volume 11, Number 3

Grassroots Preservation Awards

and Preservation Party

grassroots-logo

The 2014 Grassroots Preservation Awards and Preservation Party was held on Wednesday June 4, 2014 at Grace Church. The recipients were

For more information click here

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Six To Celebrate Tours

 

Each year HDC holds a series of tours for our Six To Celebrate neighborhoods. Below are pictures from the Atlantic Avenue tour, the Forest Close tour, and the Park Avenue tour.

If you were unable to join us on the previous tours fret not; there are four remaining tours from July-October. All tours are $5 Friends, Students, Seniors/ $10 General Public

To register for the tours go to our website by clicking here 

Forest Close, Queens

Saturday, June 7, 2014 (WALKING TOUR)

Led by architectural historian Barry Lewis, this walking tour covered some of the highlights of Forest Hills, one of the city’s most beautiful suburban-style communities developed in the early 20th century. Featured on the tour was Forest Close, a nook of 38 neo-Tudor houses surrounding a communal garden. Designed in 1927 in the spirit of the garden city movement, Forest Close can be described as an enclave within an enclave, its private orientation and country-inspired architecture lending charming appeal.

Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn

Saturday, June 14, 2014 (WALKING TOUR)

A commercial thoroughfare for more than one hundred years, Atlantic Avenue is a diverse retail and dining destination connecting the historic neighborhoods of Boerum Hill, Brooklyn Heights and Cobble Hill. Tour guide Joe Svehlak walked between 4th Avenue and Hicks Street, discussing Atlantic Avenue’s architecture, social and commercial history, as well as areas that have been more recently redeveloped.

 Park Avenue, Manhattan

Tuesday, June 17, 2014 (WALKING TOUR)

After a years-long preservation campaign by a coalition of residents, activists and community groups, 2014 is Park Avenue’s year! In February, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held an important Historic District hearing to landmark Park Avenue’s unprotected blocks, and in April, the Commission voted to landmark the district! The City Planning Commission will vote next week and City Council is expected to vote in the coming months. Tour guide Justin Ferate led this walking tour of New York City’s premier historic boulevard and explained about the effort to protect Park Avenue’s historical and architectural significance.

 

Category: Blog · Tags:

HDC@LPC – June 24, 2014

Posted by on Monday, June 23, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

 

Item 10

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF Manhattan

157594- Block 1111, lot 1-

Central Park East 72nd Street Adventure Playground – Scenic Landmark

A 1930s playground, redesigned by Richard Dattner and rebuilt in 1970, and adjoining landscaping, within an English Romantic style public park designed in 1856 by Olmsted and Vaux. Application is to replace paving, fencing, benches, and play equipment, and modify a pathway.

Item 32-E 72nd St PG-4

Item 32-E 72nd St PG-6

HDC would like to first commend the applicant on the proposed work in the West 67th Street Playground, noting the sensitive approach to working within its historic configuration. In reviewing the drawings for both the West 67th and East 72nd Street Playgrounds, our committee felt that the same sensitivity employed at West 67th Street should be granted at East 72nd Street. Given that the playground’s oval shape dates back to the 1930s and Richard Dattner’s design was conceived within that framework, HDC would prefer to see the oval retained. That design continuity and connection to the playground’s history would be a shame to lose.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Category: HDC@LPC · Tags:

North Brother Island: An Illustrated Book Talk

Posted by on Monday, June 23, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City

An Illustrated Book Talk

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Doors open at 6:00/Talk starts at 7:00

The Paris Café119 South Street (at Peck Slip)

Join us for a visual exploration of the one place most New Yorkers will never get to explore on their own. Photographer Christopher Payne will present a book talk on his recently published North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City

In 1902 famed social commentator Jacob Riis, writing about North Brother Island, which then housed the Riverside Hospital said, “Today, where once was a waste of sand, are broad and shaded lawns; winding, well-kept walks, trees, shrubs and flowers; handsome, substantial buildings and hospital pavilions or ward.” Later in his article observing the differences in smallpox hospitals in Europe
compared to this institution on North Brother Island, he noted that the “isolation secured in New York is absolute.” And though the island, 20 acres stranded in the middle of the East River, would see decades of activity both positive and tragic, this absolute isolation, even with vast transportation advancements citywide, would be the reason why the island was abandoned to nature by the middle of the 20th century.

 

Photographer Christopher Payne was granted permission by the city to photograph the island and its ruined structures, and the result is North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City. The book tells the story of the island; its thriving years, its connection to a number of infamous events and people, and recent decades when vegetation has consumed the now crumbling buildings. The book includes photography by Mr. Payne, a history of the island by University of Pennsylvania professor and preservationist Randall Mason, and an essay by author Robert Sullivan.

N-Brother Island-640

Program is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.
To register, please call 212-614-9107 or email bharmon@hdc.org.

*Food and drinks will be available for purchase
The Paris Café, first opened in 1873, was frequented by such personages as Thomas Edison and Theodore Roosevelt, and was nearly closed after sustaining damage from Superstorm Sandy.
 

This program is being co-sponsored by Fordham University Press
FUP

 

 

Category: Event, Featured, Program & Events · Tags: , , , ,

2014 Graduate Thesis Presentations

Posted by on Friday, June 20, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

On May 28, 2014 the Historic Districts Council hosted a graduate thesis presentation in the offices of the World Monument Fund in the Empire State Building. The call for proposals stated.

As the only citywide voice for community-based preservation, the Historic Districts Council is eager to recognize graduate work that makes a contribution to historic preservation in New York City. We hope that students will consider submitting works addressing the full spectrum of issues: cultural, political, esthetic, material, historical and others.  The purpose of this presentation is to enrich the field of preservation advocacy in New York City by making fresh scholarship available to a wide audience.

001027003010

Presentations

 

168Measuring the Impact of Historic District Designation on Real Estate in New York City

Julia Lewis (Columbia University)

 

166Tapestry Brick Dwellings: The Emergence of a Residential Type in Brooklyn

Jonathan Taylor (Columbia University)

 

 

165No Building Left Behind: Gaining Energy Efficiency in New York City’s State and National Register Properties

Lakan Cole (Pratt Institute)

 

 

167The Manhattan Taxpayer Building: Symbol of Decline and Catalyst for Change

Lauren Hall Wallis (Columbia University)

 

134Early Twentieth Century “Face Brick” as a National Industry (New York City Focus)

By Julie Rosen (Columbia University)

 

169The Future of Preservation, Preservation of the Future

Jessica Baldwin (Pratt Institute)


Category: Event, Materials, National Register, Program & Events, Young Professional · Tags:

2014 Grassroots Preservation Awards and Preservation Party -Pictures

Posted by on Thursday, June 19, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

grassroots-logo-640

The 2014 Grassroots Preservation Awards and Preservation Party was held on Wednesday June 4,2014 at Grace Church. The recipients were:

For more information click here

Category: Featured, Grassroots Awards · Tags: , , , , , , ,

Six To Celebrate Tour- Forest Close, Queens-Pictures

Posted by on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

Forest Close, Queens
Saturday, June 7, 2014 (WALKING TOUR)

Led by architectural historian Barry Lewis, this walking tour will cover some of the highlights of Forest Hills, one of the city’s most beautiful suburban-style communities developed in the early 20th century. Featured on the tour is Forest Close, a nook of 38 neo-Tudor houses surrounding a communal garden. Designed in 1927 in the spirit of the garden city movement, Forest Close can be described as an enclave within an enclave, its private orientation and country-inspired architecture lending charming appeal.

Category: Six To Celebrate 2014 · Tags:

Six To Celebrate Tours- Park Avenue, Manhattan-Pictures

Posted by on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 · 1 Comment 

Park Avenue, Manhattan
Tuesday, June 17, 2014 (WALKING TOUR)

After a years-long preservation campaign by a coalition of residents, activists and community groups, 2014 is Park Avenue’s year! In February, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held an important Historic District hearing to landmark Park Avenue’s unprotected blocks, and in April, the Commission voted to landmark the district! Votes by the City Planning Commission and City Council are expected in the coming months. Join tour guide Justin Ferate on this walking tour of New York City’s premier historic boulevard and learn more about the effort to protect Park Avenue’s historical and architectural significance.

Category: Six To Celebrate 2014 · Tags: ,

Thanks for Visiting

The Historic Districts Council is the advocate for all of New York City's historic neighborhoods. HDC is the only organization in New York that works directly with people who care about our city's historic neighborhoods and buildings. We represent a constituency of over 500 local community organizations.

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