HDC@LPC – August 5, 2014

Item 1
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF QUEENS
158868- Block 8039, lot 22-
112 Manor Road – Douglaston Historic District
A Colonial Revival style house designed by William Welles Knowles and built in 1910. Application is to enclose and enlarge a porch, construct a below-grade garage, and install a curb cut.

Item 1_112 Manor Road_5

 

Item 1_112 Manor Road_6

Since porches are a typical feature in Douglaston, HDC would prefer to see this one retain more of its sunroom character. If its size remained at just half-way across the west elevation, it could be enclosed in a way that maintains its language as a porch. HDC finds the curb cut to be appropriate, but feels that the garage, since it will project outward by six feet, is too heavy an intervention. A freestanding garage would be a more appropriate solution.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 2
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF QUEENS
144585- Block 8059, lot 25-
233-33 38th Drive – Douglaston Historic District
A vacant lot created by a sub-division. Application is to construct a new house.

Item 2_233-33 38th Drive_8

HDC generally finds the design of this new house to be contextual to the Douglaston Historic District. However, the monumental scale of the double-height, corner columns gives the structure an institutional, rather than residential, character. If scaled down and produced of wood, rather than plaster, HDC could find them a more appropriate component of the design.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 5
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN
158219- Block 1159, lot 82-
285 Park Place – Prospect Heights Historic District
A Renaissance Revival style rowhouse designed by William H. Reynolds and built in 1898. Application is to alter the bay window and construct a new deck at the rear.

Item 5-285 Park Place

In the designation report for this district, the rear window bays are specifically called out as an intact feature of this row. HDC feels that the proposed bay redesign on 285 Park Place, with its steel casement windows, reflects a style more fitting for the early 20th century, rather than the late 19th century, and would prefer to see the current one refurbished or recreated in sheet metal. Our committee also found the color scheme to be problematic, as the black paint would obscure some of the rear façade’s nice details, such as the cornice and the panels on the bay window, while calling too much attention to non-decorative details, such as the drainage pipes along the eastern edge of the house. The committee also found that the rear deck, which seems unnecessarily fancy for a rear façade, protrudes quite far into the rear yard.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 7
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
152081- Block 474, lot 7506-
40 Mercer Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District
A steel-and-glass building designed by Atelier Jean Nouvel and built in c. 2006. Application is to alter granite sidewalk.

Edited_Item 16-40 Mercer

HDC commends the applicant for their sensitive, creative solution to this sidewalk renovation. Elements like granite sidewalks retain the luster characteristic of historic districts, and we would like to see this trend followed when making repairs to historic paving.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 8
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
158917- Block 510, lot 6-
284 Lafayette Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District Extension
A neo-Grec style factory building designed by John R. Thomas and built in 1891-1892. Application is to remove vault light covers and to install diamond plate steel plate at the sidewalk.

Item 8_284 Lafayette_3

Replacing the existing diamond plate with new diamond plate is not in itself a bad solution. However, there is an opportunity here to return this sidewalk to its historic condition with the reintroduction of vault lights, a feature seen throughout much of the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. As always, HDC would love to see the return of vault lights, which are manufactured by Circle Redmont in Melbourne, Florida, and elsewhere.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 15
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
153736- Block 640, lot 50-
340 West 12th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District
An Italianate style rowhouse built 1859-60. Application is to construct a rooftop addition, alter the rear façade, and perform excavation.

Item 15_340 W 12_3

Item 15_340 W 12_7

HDC commends the restoration of this rowhouse’s front elevation, including the cornice, stoop and installation of functional shutters. As the rooftop addition is not visible from the street, our committee did not find it objectionable. We would ask, though, that the applicant consider retaining more of the historic fenestration on the rear’s second floor, which, as rendered, appears quite grand in the amount of proposed glazing. As always, HDC also asks that great care be taken in the excavation of the rear yard, so as not to disturb neighboring buildings and foundations.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 19
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
157562- Block 1124, lot 46-
20 West 72nd Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District
A neo-Renaissance style apartment hotel designed by Herbert J. Krapp and built 1925. Application is to install storefront infill.

Item 19_20 W 72

HDC finds the proposed storefront infill to be a great improvement over the existing. The light fixtures gave us pause, though, as they seem to echo those found on a late 19th century building, like The Dakota, rather than this 1925 building. Our committee asks that the applicant reconsider the gas lights in favor of fixtures that would be more appropriate to this building’s construction date.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 1
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
157602- Block 10, lot 1-
33 Peck Slip – South Street Seaport Historic District
A group of five commercial buildings built between 1851 and 1856. Application is to install awnings, light fixtures, and railings, and remove a landing platform.

33 Peck Slip_2

HDC finds this storefront renovation a welcome improvement to the South Street Seaport. Our committee found the painted wooden signage and lighting particularly nice touches. We wondered, though, if the number of light fixtures on the piers could be reduced so that they do not clutter the bases of these mid-19th century buildings.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 2
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
157715- Block 97, lot 49-
233 Water Street – South Street Seaport Historic District
A two-story structure built in the mid-twentieth century. Application is to alter façades, replace windows and doors, and install rooftop mechanical equipment and a fence.

233 Water St_4

HDC supports the adaptive reuse of this fishing industry building and commends the applicant for preserving existing openings, including the location of the former loading dock and window openings. That said, the committee suggests choosing a more transparent fence set back at the building’s termination.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 3
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
149952- Block 545, lot 37-
434 Lafayette Street – Individual Landmark, NoHo Historic District
A Greek Revival style townhouse with a two-story Corinthian colonnade, attributed to Seth Geer, and built in 1832-33. Application is to install a marquee, signage and lighting.

434 Lafayette

This application is before the Commission today because of an expired Certificate of Appropriateness. Certificates of Appropriateness have expiration dates in order to provide the opportunity to reconsider a proposed project and, perhaps, to come up with a better scheme. The proposed signage, marquee and lighting is a similar iteration of what currently exists, and HDC feels that this is a lost opportunity to create something more handsome for this building, which is part of the very notable Colonnade Row.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 4
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
157515- Block 531, lot 7504-
380 Lafayette Street – Individual Landmark, NoHo Historic District
A Romanesque Revival style store and loft building designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh and built in 1888. Application is to replace doors.

380 Lafayette

HDC applauds this sensitive and thoughtful door replacement. The materials employed, including decorative ironwork and wood are an enhancement to this building. Stylistically, the materials and design are compatible with the heaviness and monumentality inherent in Romanesque Revival style architecture.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 5
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
158496- Block 529, lot 25-
31 Bond Street – NoHo Extension Historic District
A Renaissance Revival style store and loft building designed by DeLemos & Cordes and built in 1888-1889. Application is to alter the ground floor, install storefront infill, replace windows, construct a new rear façade and rooftop addition, and excavate the cellar.

31 Bond St_3

HDC finds the storefront proposal an improvement and the retention and restoration of the pinwheel windows laudable. While the ground floor succeeds, the rooftop is another matter. Seemingly innocuous, the rooftop bulk will be highly visible on this building of only six stories from the alleyway and low-scale building at Lafayette and Bleecker Streets. HDC asks that the addition and equipment be reduced and reconfigured to lessen their visual impact.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Public Meeting Item 6
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
153774- Block 608, lot 13-
152 West 13th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District
A Greek Revival style rowhouse built in 1846. Application is to construct rooftop and rear yard additions, and replace windows.

152 W 13 St

This little 1846 house becomes lost in these cumulative accretions. It seems to be a case of, what a former Commissioner used to describe as asking too much from a little house. HDC asks that the full-width rear yard and rooftop additions both be reduced so that the historic house’s original character is retained.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 7
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
158983- Block 1265, lot 7501-
30 Rockefeller Plaza – Individual Landmark and Interior Landmark
A two-story Art Deco style skyscraper lobby designed by the Associated Architects and built in 1931-33 as part of an Art Deco style office, commercial and entertainment complex, which comprises the Rockefeller Center Individual Landmark. Application is to create signage vitrines within storefront windows, and apply a decorative finish to the ceiling, at the mezzanine.

Item 25_30 Rock_3_edited

HDC finds the storefront vitrines appropriate, noting the historic commercial nature of this Individual Landmark and this area of Manhattan. 30 Rock already has a decorative finish on its interior, so much so that it is a designated Interior Landmark. HDC feels that this iconic interior should be left alone; its existing panache does not beckon competition.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Public Meeting Item 8
CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN
127232- Block 1501, lot 11-
15 East 90th Street – Individual Landmark
A neo-Federal style house designed by Mott B. Schmidt and built in 1927-28. Application is to legalize façade work performed without Landmarks Preservation Commission permits.

Item 30_15 E 90 St_3

HDC’s Public Review Committee urges the applicant to explore alternative solutions to rectify the deterioration of the stone on this individually landmarked building. Its architect, Mott Schmidt, designed numerous notable buildings for families such as the Astors, the Morgans and the Vanderbilts, and this house deserves its marble to be repaired, not painted over.

LPC determination: Approved

Historic Pub Crawl- Pictures

The Historic Districts Council and Chrysalis Archeological Consultants  led a tour  of the architecture, history and beverages of some of New York City’s oldest watering holes. The tour  began with a tasting of Chrysalis bitters at the Merchant’s House, brewed from an historic recipe and inspired by a 19th century bottle recently found at a Bowery archaeological site, which promised to be an “Elixir of Long Life.” The tour then continued up third Avenue to McSorley’s, Pete’s Tavern and Old Town.

HDC@LPC July 22, 2014

Item 1

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF QUEENS

156207- Block 8040, lot 68-

102 Shore Road – Douglaston Historic District

A Colonial Revival style house designed by H.H. Ross and built in 1908, and a freestanding garage built in 1910. Application is to alter fenestration, install new railings, create a new exterior stair and install paving.

Item 1_102 Shore Rd_1_edited

HDC finds the overall proposal for this 1908 Colonial Revival appropriate, but we ask the Commission to pay special attention to the shape of the porch balusters. This house retains some of its original posts and columns, treated in the Doric order. The tax photo reveals that the balusters had minimal treatment, in unison with the posts, and we ask that this design be replicated accurately.

APPROVED

 

Item 20

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158672- Block 294, lot 8-

54 Canal Street – S. Jarmulowsky Bank Building, Individual Landmark

A neo-Renaissance style bank and office building designed by Rouse & Goldstone and built in 1911-12. Application is to request that the Landmarks Preservation Commission issue a report to the City Planning Commission relating to an application for a Modification of Bulk pursuant to Section 74-711 of the Zoning Resolution.

Item 20_54 Canal_edited

We are particularly pleased to see that new life is breathed into this building, and with it, the tower which once crowned this Individual Landmark. Our objection is solely to the choice of a vastly inferior substitute material, Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) to replace the terra cotta of the original design and construction of the pinnacle. We suspect that this choice of a lighter thin-shelled material will represent a cost savings over the recreation of terra cotta. That said, a 74-711 justifies a return to the original material, and to this end HDC asks that the tower be reconstructed in terra cotta. Further, it will better match in luster and texture the terra cotta Renaissance ornament which still graces this building’s upper stories.

APPROVED

Item 22

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

156218- Block 819, lot 77-

604-612 Avenue of the Americas – Ladies’ Mile Historic District

A Beaux-Arts style store and loft building designed by Buchman & Fox and built in 1910-12. Application is to modify existing signage and to install flagpoles and banners.

Item 22_604 Sixth Ave_2_edited

HDC asks that the sign remain where it is. The sign is symmetrically placed on the marquee, which in turn is symmetrically placed on the façade of the building. Regarding the flag poles and banners, in the past the Commission has found it appropriate at times to allow such things along Sixth Avenue, but not on side streets of the Ladies Mile Historic District. HDC asks that this precedent continue to be followed along 18th Street.

APPROVED

Item 23

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158308- Block 859, lot 26-

30 East 30th Street – Martha Washington Hotel, Individual Landmark

A Renaissance Revival style hotel designed by Robert W. Gibson and built in 1901-03. Application is to install signage.

Item 23_30 E 30 St_2_edited

HDC applauds the use of the Martha Washington Hotel’s historic logo and the reemergence of the painted wall sign. While our committee generally appreciates the approach to the signage program, the banner signs seem excessive.

APPROVED

Item 24

ADVISORY REPORT

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

15-9129 – Block 1296, lot 7501–

110 East 42nd Street-Bowery Savings Bank Building – Individual & Interior Landmark

An Academic Italian Romanesque style bank and office building designed
by York & Sawyer and W. Louis Ayres and built in 1921-23 with an
addition built in 1931-33. Advisory review of the design of the new
building that will be constructed pursuant to Modification of Use 10-9130
which supported a proposal for the transfer of development rights from 110
East 42nd Street to 317-325 Madison Avenue, aka 1 Vanderbilt Avenue.
Zoned C5-3 in the Grand Central Sub-district of the Special Midtown
District.

Item 24_1 Vanderbilt_edited

 

HDC finds that the proposed design for 1 Vanderbilt does not share a harmonious relationship with Grand Central Terminal. The Committee feels that the cut-away feature in the base of 1 Vanderbilt is a hollow gesture to the grandeur of the Terminal, and it almost threatens to consume the shorter Individual Landmark. A solid streetwall typical of this area of East Midtown would be a more appropriate fit. HDC also laments the loss of the State and National Register listed properties that exist in the footprint of the proposed 1 Vanderbilt development. These buildings, because of their age, design, scale, and materials, share a true dialog with the Terminal, their longtime neighbor, and should be used, instead of discarded.

Finally, HDC is puzzled by this particular  permit process.  If this is only an advisory report, what is the binding authority which the LPC will be advising?  Does every new building in the special district require a harmonious relationship with Grand Central Terminal?  If there is to be an increase in new development in East Midtown, the process should be made clear so that interested parties are able to focus their energies and knowledge in the correct forums.

 

Item 25

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158983- Block 1265, lot 7501-

30 Rockefeller Plaza – (former) RCA Building/Rockefeller Center,

Individual Landmark and Interior Landmark
A two-story Art Deco style skyscraper lobby designed by the Associated
Architects and built in 1931-33 as part of an Art Deco style office, commercial and entertainment complex, which comprises the Rockefeller Center Individual Landmark. Application is to create signage vitrines within storefront windows, and apply a decorative finish to the ceiling, at the mezzanine.

Item 25_30 Rock_3_edited

HDC finds the storefront vitrines appropriate, noting the historic commercial nature of this Individual Landmark and this area of Manhattan. 30 Rock already has a decorative finish on its interior, so much so that it is a designated Interior Landmark. HDC feels that this iconic interior should be left alone; its existing panache does not beckon competition.

LAID OVER

Item 26

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

151734- Block 874, lot 33-

149-151 East 18th Street – Gramercy Park Historic District
A hotel building with stores designed by Elfenbein/Cox, Inc. and built in 1991. A pair of Italianate style rowhouses built in 1853-1854. Application is to paint the façade.

Item 26_149-151 E 18_edited

HDC asks if it is feasible to strip the paint off of the brick as a first strategy. The Committee was unsure of the basis or inspiration of the color palette proposed for painting the bricks. Further, we noted the all-masonry streetscape where several buildings boast bare brick, and this building could set a precedent for its neighbors to follow suit.

APPROVED

Item 27

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

148059- Block 1121, lot 154 and 55-

48-50 West 69th Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District

Two Renaissance Revival style rowhouses designed by Gilbert A. Schellenger and built in 1892-93. Application is to construct new rear façades, a rooftop addition, and modify the front façades at West 69th Street.

Item 27_48-50 W 69_3_edited

This is another case of two single-family homes being combined into a single residence; a similar property came before the Commission last week, and it was discussed that large-scale projects like this one should strive to blend in and maintain an appearance of two separate buildings on the street. This project introduces architectural elements on the street which never existed. The Juliet balcony above the entry at no. 50 is inappropriate as there is no precedent for such an alteration. As a suggestion, the applicant could propose a stoop restoration, which would harmonize and unify the block. HDC also finds the rear yard extension’s scale overwhelming and window design inappropriate. HDC believes that an applicant’s individual design choices should not come at the expense of the historic district, but rather enhance it.

APPROVED

Item 30

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

157872- Block 1203, lot 21-

31 West 89th Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District
A Renaissance Revival style rowhouse designed by Gilbert A. Schellenger and built in 1894-95. Application is to demolish an existing rear yard addition, raise the roof, construct rooftop bulkheads and a rear yard addition, and excavate at the cellar and rear yard.

Item 30_31 W 89_edited

HDC applauds the restoration of the front stoop to this rowhouse and finds the rooftop bulk to be appropriate. In the rear, HDC was happy to see that the 5th floor brick detail will be retained, but finds the floor-to-ceiling windows to be overwhelming to the rear façade.

APPROVED

Item 32

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

159134- Block 1227, lot 27-

203-209 West 79th Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District
A group of four rowhouses originally built in 1896-97 and combined into one apartment building with a new Modern style façade designed by Joseph Feingold in 1972-74. Application is to demolish the existing building and construct a new building.

Item 32_203-209 W 79_3_edited

HDC would like to applaud the use of terra cotta on this new building, but we feel that the potential of this material is not being completely realized. We remind the Commission about the sophisticated, all terra-cotta new construction at 529 Broadway, which plays on the material’s strengths as both decorative and a nod to the historic district. HDC also urges the Commission to consider a setback starting at the fifth floor, to preserve the scale of the existing streetscape and not compete with the incomparable Lucerne next door. The proposed balconies emit an uncomfortable relationship to the historic rowhouses next door. The Committee wonders if this balcony feature could be moved to the rear of the building, as there is not a precedent for street-fronting balconies on West 79th Street.

NO ACTION

Item 34

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

156674- Block 1384, lot 32-

700 Park Avenue – Upper East Side Historic District

An apartment building designed by Kahn & Jacobs, Paul Resnick & Harry Green, and built in 1959. Application is to re-clad the facade.

Item 34_700 Park Ave_edited

HDC is glad to see that the brick will be replaced wholesale on this building, as it is a much more sensitive manner than a piecemeal approach. In reviewing the brick options for the recladding, our committee finds the Elgin-Butler glazed brick to be an excellent choice for both its aesthetic cohesion with the original design intent and for its durability. We strongly encourage the applicant to choose this brick.

APPROVED

Item 35

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158312- Block 1389, lot 56-

14 East 75th Street – Upper East Side Historic District
A neo-Medieval style apartment building designed by Schwartz & Gross and built in 1928-29. Application is to modify window openings and enlarge a rooftop addition.

Item 35_14 E 75_edited

HDC applauds the applicant on this very sensitive approach to enlarging the rooftop addition, and finds the reinstallation of the corner quoins to be a particularly nice touch.

APPROVED

Item 37

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158022- Block 1522, lot 158-

138 East 94th Street – Carnegie Hill Historic District
A neo-Renaissance style flats building with stores designed by Neville & Bagge and built in 1901-02. Application is to install a barrier-free access ramp.

Item 37_138 E 94_edited

HDC asks that the size of the proposed access ramp be minimized so as not to block so much of this fine building’s ground floor.

APPROVED

BK Live-Losing Our Churches

Posted by on Friday, July 18, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

On July 17, 2014 Simeon Bankoff Executive Director of the Historic Districts Council discussed how many Brooklyn churches are being converted into condos.

BRICartsmedia.org/bkindiemedia

BK Live 07/17/14: Losing Our Churches from Brooklyn Independent Media on Vimeo.

Category: Brooklyn · Tags:

Articles on the Assaults on the Landmarks Process

Posted by on Monday, July 14, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

Press Articles on the Proposed Landmarks Reforms

Demolition freeze may cover 80% of the city: Crains, April 14, 2014

The Historic Districts Council says the city’s historic districts are not to blame for the shortage of affordable housing: Daily News, February 26, 2014

The NY Real Estate Board’s 50-Year War on Landmarks: New york History Blog, August 1, 2013

Landlords take aim at rampant landmarking: Crains New York, July 11, 2013

Landmark advocates recall Alamo-like efforts: Chelsea Now, November 3, 2012

HDC: Proposed Legislation Would Undermine the Landmarks Preservation Commission: City Land, October 5, 2012

New York Landmark Status Misused, Says Group Preservationists say New York’s history under attack:Epoch Times, June 21, 2012

Preservationists Issue Rallying Cry, Prepare to Save Landmarks Law from Big Real Estate: New York Observer, June 14th, 2012

Proposed Bill a “Deliberate Attack” Landmarks Law, Opponents Say, DNAinfo, May 2, 2012

LPC Speaks Out Against Controversial Landmarks Bills, The Real Deal, May 2, 2012

Battle Landmarkia, The Architect’s Newspaper, May 3, 2012

Real Estate Bigs Ready Wrecking Ball for Landmarks Laws, Curbed, May 9, 2012

Queens Councilman Says Building Owners Need Protection From Landmark Laws, DNAinfo, May 9, 2012

Business,labor team up to target Landmarks, Crain’s New York Business, June 6, 2012

The War on Landmarks Moves to Defcon 2, The New York Observer, June 6, 2012

Landmark Backlash, The New York Post, June 7, 2012

New York Landmarks Status Misused, Say Group, The Epoch Times, June 21, 2012

City Council Proposes Important Changes To Landmarks Law, Cityland, July 2012 (page 76)

 

Category: landmarks law · Tags:

Historic Pub Crawl

Posted by on Wednesday, July 9, 2014 · 2 Comments 

Pub Crawl-Sept

Join the Historic Districts Council and Chrysalis Archeological Consultants for a taste of the architecture, history and beverages of some of New York City’s oldest watering holes. The tour will begin with a tasting of Chrysalis bitters, brewed from an historic recipe and inspired by a 19th century bottle recently found at a Bowery archaeological site, which promised to be an “Elixir of Long Life.” With that fortification , we will move on to the saw dust floors, neon signs and dumb waiters of 3 well-known and long-loved neighborhood establishments whose long lives have seen their share of social and architectural history. The tour will end with bar snacks and conversation. Really what more can you ask for…

Saturday, September 6, 2014 at 1PM

To purchase tickets for this event, click below

* Cost includes tasting of Chrysalis bitters and noshes at Old Town bar; beverages available for purchase

The tour has limited capacity. To inquiry whether there is room, please contact Brigid Harmon at bharmon@hdc.org

 

Category: Program & Events · Tags: ,

A Good Summer= Good Drinks and a Good Book

Posted by on Monday, July 7, 2014 · 1 Comment 

   E-BULLETIN OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

June 2014, Volume 11, Number 5

 

 Historic Pub Crawl

Pub crawl-dark

Join the Historic Districts Council and Chrysalis Archeological Consultants for a taste of the architecture, history and beverages of some of New York City’s oldest watering holes. The tour will begin with a tasting of Chrysalis bitters, brewed from an historic recipe and inspired by a 19th century bottle recently found at a Bowery archeological site, which promised to be an “Elixir of Long Life.” With that fortification , we will move on to the saw dust floors, neon signs and dumb waiters of 3 well-known and long-loved neighborhood establishments whose long lives have seen their share of social and architectural history. The tour will end with bar snacks and conversation. Really what more can you ask for…

Saturday, July 19, 2014

1:00 PM

$10

* Cost includes tasting of Chrysalis bitters and noshes at Old Town bar; beverages available for purchase.

To Purchase Tickets Click Here

——————————————————————————————————

North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City

An Illustrated Book Talk

N-Brother Island

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Doors open at 6:00/Talk starts at 7:00

The Paris Cafe, 119 South Street (at Peck Slip)

Join us for a visual exploration of the one place most New Yorkers will never get to explore on their own.Photographer Christopher Payne will present a book talk on his recently published North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City 

Photographer Christopher Payne was granted permission by the city to photograph the island and its ruined structures, and the result is North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City. The book tells the story of the island; its thriving years, its connection to a number of infamous events and people, and recent decades when vegetation has consumed the now crumbling buildings. The book includes photography by Mr. Payne, a history of the island by University of Pennsylvania professor and preservationist Randall Mason, and an essay by author Robert Sullivan.

Program is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

To register, please call 212-614-9107 or email bharmon@hdc.org.

For more information click here 

*Food and drinks will be available for purchase

The Paris Café, first opened in 1873, was frequented by such personages as Thomas Edison and Theodore Roosevelt, and nearly closed after sustaining damage from Superstorm Sandy.

This program is being co-sponsored by Fordham University Press

FUP

Category: Blog, E-bulletin · Tags:

HDC@LPC July 8, 2014

Posted by on Monday, July 7, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

Item 3

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF QUEENS

157412- Block 8020, lot 6-

10 Richmond Road – Douglaston Historic District

A Colonial Revival style house built in 1966. Application is to legalize repaving the driveway, sidewalk, and gutter, enlarging and repaving the front walkway, rebuilding the entrance steps, and rebuilding the driveway retaining wall without permits.

Edited_Item 3_10 Richmond Rd

Landscaping, such as the driveway, retaining wall, entrance walkway and steps are specifically called out as notable features in the designation report for this property. In the Douglaston Historic District, where freestanding houses dominate, these elements are especially prominent. HDC laments the destruction of these features and the precedent that this type of work may set, and is confused that the DOT allowed this work to be completed without LPC permits. Concerning the removal of historic cobblestone street gutters, HDC would like to mention that just this past May, the Commission denied an application at 105 Grosvenor Street to remove street gutters. These gutters once ran east to west along all the streets in Douglas Manor to facilitate water run-off.  The few remaining ones still serve their intended function, preventing large puddles and standing water from accumulating in the neighborhood. At 10 Richmond Road, the gutter has been repaved in Belgian block, but raised flush with the pavement. At the very least, HDC asks that a more appropriate treatment of the gutter be constructed here.

LAID OVER

 

Item 4

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN

157494- Block 2382, lot 3-

2 Fillmore Place – Fillmore Place Historic District

A vacant lot. Application is to construct a new building.

Edited_Item 4_2 Fillmore Place

When the Fillmore Place Historic District was designated back in 2009, HDC was delighted that this small, but historically intact, section of Williamsburg would be protected from the rapid change the neighborhood has experienced in the past decade. While HDC finds the height and bulk of the proposed new building at 2 Fillmore Place to be reasonable, we could not help but notice that the building seems to better reflect the buildings being constructed elsewhere in Williamsburg, rather than the context of the historic district. There is no precedent in the district for the use of clear finished wood, and the high quantity of glass is incongruous with the rest of the block. This proposal seems to be a missed opportunity to work within the district’s existing palette, which is predominantly masonry with elegant storefronts. HDC asks that extra care be taken with proposals in the Fillmore Place Historic District, which provides a crucial glimpse into the history of this part of Brooklyn.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 9

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN

158123- Block 248, lot 15-

98 Montague Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

A Renaissance Revival style hotel built in 1909 and 1914. Application is to replace an entrance canopy at the Montague Street entrance.

Edited_Item 9_98 Montague St

HDC is thrilled that the stately Hotel Bossert is being restored, and does not object to the removal of the present entrance canopy. However, based on historic photographs of the building, a fabric canopy would be more appropriate and less of a permanent intervention than the one proposed here.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 10

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN

155058- Block 324, lot 68-

146 Willow Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

A neo-Grec style rowhouse built before 1900 and altered prior to 1940. Application is to install a stoop, new entry door and surround, replace windows, alter the rear faηade, and construct a rooftop addition.

Edited Item 10_146 Willow St

HDC commends the applicant on a very sensitive restoration of this rowhouse to its original appearance. Our committee approves of the changes to the rear façade and the reasonable size and setback of the rooftop addition, and appreciates the quality of the materials chosen for the project, including brownstone cladding and wood entrance door and replacement windows. Given the attention to detail and quality, HDC’s only suggestion is that the applicant consider the use of a wood cornice, as fiberglass cornices often achieve a flatter, less authentic look.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 11

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN

140356- Block 264, lot 25-

144 Clinton Street – Brooklyn Heights Historic District

A store building built post-1900 and altered in the Moderne style c.1940. Application is to demolish the building and construct a new building incorporating salvaged elements.

Edited_Item 11

HDC feels that the applicant did an excellent job of identifying other Art Moderne elements in the neighborhood, yet we feel that they have missed an opportunity to incorporate them into this project. The attempted glass corner windows reach too far into the facades of the building, reading more as a curtain wall than a referential Art Deco element. HDC laments the loss of the building’s ground floor, and finds the proposed amount of glazing along Aitken Place, as well as the floor-to-floor window openings dotting the building to be excessive and not contextual to the block or the Brooklyn Heights Historic District.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 13

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN

147989- Block 1234, lot 10-

816 Prospect Place – Crown Heights North II Historic District

A Renaissance Revival style flats building designed by Axel S. Hedman and built in 1901. Application is to modify windows, security cameras, and light fixtures, all installed without Landmarks Preservation Commission permit(s); and to legalize the installation of window security grilles, an intercom panel, and an areaway railing, without Landmarks Preservation Commission permit(s).

Edited_Item 13_816 Prospect Place

Many of the problems created here could have been avoided by consulting with LPC staff. Each accretion is stylistically and historically inappropriate and detracts from this otherwise handsome Renaissance Revival building.  We urge the staff to work with the applicant to find a solution that meets both security needs and the aesthetic needs of the district.

LPC determination: Denied

 

Item 14

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

156223- Block 15, lot 22-

21 West Street – Individual Landmark

An Art Deco style office building designed by Starrett & Van Vleck and built in 1929-31. Application is to install a removable flood mitigation system.

Edited_Item 14_21 West St

Unfortunately, Hurricane Sandy revealed the vulnerability of our historic buildings to flooding in Lower Manhattan. HDC is pleased that aesthetics were a priority in safeguarding this Individual Landmark from water infiltration, as the flood mitigation mounting system is unobtrusive in design. We appreciate that the flood panels are removable, and therefore not a permanent interruption to the base of this handsome Jazz Age skyscraper.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 15

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

148387- Block 180, lot 15-

15 Jay Street – TriBeCa West Historic District

A Romanesque Revival style store and loft building with neo-Grec style elements designed by D. & J. Jardine and built in 1887. Application is to install new storefront infill and construct a rooftop addition

Edited_Item 15_15 Jay St

HDC feels that double-hung windows are a residential element and do not belong on a store and loft building.  In the case that operable windows are desired in this space, the Committee suggests creating operable transoms on this former storefront. We also find the bulkhead too visible from many vantage points, and recommend incorporating a hydraulic elevator to try to reduce this bulk on the roof.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 16

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

152081- Block 474, lot 7506-

40 Mercer Street – SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District

A steel-and-glass building designed by Atelier Jean Nouvel and built in c. 2006. Application is to alter granite sidewalk.

Edited_Item 16-40 Mercer

HDC commends the applicant for their sensitive, creative solution to this sidewalk renovation.  Elements like granite sidewalks retain the luster characteristic of historic districts, and we would like to see this trend followed when making repairs to historic paving.

LAID OVER

 

Item 17

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

151397- Block 530, lot 24-

35 Great Jones Street – NoHo Extension Historic District

A Romanesque Revival style store and loft building designed by Cleverdon & Putzel and built in 1893-94. Application is to legalize sidewalk work completed in non-compliance with Landmarks Preservation Commission permits.

Edited_Item 17_35 Great Jones St

HDC does not find concrete poured over historic vault lights to be acceptable work as it removes visible historic fabric from the district. We ask the Commission to deny the proposal and to instruct the applicant to restore, repair or replace the vault lights that contribute so much to the character of the historic building and the district.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 19

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

158323- Block 531, lot 20-

383 Lafayette Street – NoHo Historic District
A simplified neo-Classical style store and loft building designed by Gronenberg & Leuchtag and built in 1913; and a parking lot with a concrete-block wall. Application is to replace storefront infill, reconstruct the facades, install an entrance canopy, install rooftop mechanical equipment and bulkheads and construct a new building on the vacant lot.

Edited_Item 19_383 Lafayette

383 Lafayette Street’s aesthetics rely heavily in its simple, yet elegant, massing. Its four bays of grouped fenestration, brick piers, and brick banding are specifically called out in its designation report. For this reason, HDC asks that the rusticated piers remain on the ground floor of this building. Without them, the facades above the ground floor appear to awkwardly float.

Regarding the new construction, HDC finds the design and rhythm a sympathetic neighbor to the historic building. That said, we discourage the use of GFRC as proposed for the sun screen, and suggest that a higher quality material more fitting to the district such as terra cotta be used on this otherwise commendable marriage of old and new design.

The presence of a canopy orients pedestrians to the building’s presence on the street, rendering the signage flags superfluous and HDC asks that the canopy be designed to draw less attention to itself. Additionally, we would applaud smaller-scaled rooftop bulk.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Item 21

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

153825- Block 609, lot 7501-

147 West 13th Street – Greenwich Village Historic District

A Greek Revival style rowhouse designed by John Hanrahan and built in 1847-48. Application is to excavate the areaway, alter the front faηade, enlarge an existing rear yard addition, and construct a garden shed.

Edited_Item 21

HDC commends the applicant on their choice to replace the windows to match the 1940s tax photograph. In keeping with this historically sensitive mindset, we ask that the areaway be restored to a rusticated stone appearance, as described in its designation report.  Further, for the amount of excavation imposed on this building, we ask for clarification as to the appearance and the purpose of the rear shed-like structure.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 23

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

156175- Block 575, lot 3-

470 Sixth Avenue – Greenwich Village Historic District

A vernacular style house built in 1844. Application is to modify storefront infill installed in non-compliance with Certificate of Appropriateness.

Edited_Item 23_470 Sixth Ave

As described in its designation report, “Little houses like this…retain the homogenous scale and use of materials of the best of the village.” To this end, HDC asks that this storefront be configured to conform to what the previously approved Certificate of Appropriateness called for in the master plan in this row of buildings. It was unclear to the Committee why this storefront is composed entirely of doors. We ask simply that a store front be put back into this storefront.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 24

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

153481- Block 825, lot 17-

43 West 23rd Street aka 24-28 West 24th Street – Ladies’ Mile Historic District

A neo-Renaissance style store building designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh and builtin 1893-94. Application is to replace the entrance infill.

Edited_Item 24_43 W 23 St

HDC commends the sensitive approach taken in this project to install a revolving door, including matching the wood finishes, brass details and wood and glass kickplates of the double doors and preserving the historic portico. HDC would like to clarify, though, that the new revolving and swing doors will be aligned and uniform in their height. The photo rendering shows a difference in height between the two, whereas the drawing shows them lined up.

LPC determination: Approved

 

Item 25

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

156906- Block 1196, lot 29-

225 Central Park West – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District

A neo-Renaissance style apartment hotel building designed by Emery Roth and built in 1925-26. Application is to establish a master plan governing the future installation of windows

Edited_Item 25_225 CPW

225 Central Park West, also known as Hotel Alden, is one of Emery Roth’s more austere compositions along Central Park West. Larger buildings like this one rely on their fenestration pattern as a significant design component. Hotel Alden historically had a six-over-one window arrangement on portions of its primary façade. HDC asks that in the creation of a master plan, more historic research is needed to inform the design of all future windows.

LPC determination: Approved with modifications

 

Item 27

CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN

148148- Block 1212, lot 18-

141 West 81st Street – Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District

A Romanesque Revival style rowhouse with Queen Anne style elements designed by Rossiter & Wright and built in 1886-87. Application is to construct rooftop and rear yard additions.

Edited_Item 27_141 W 81 St

This row of houses is entirely intact—both on the front and rear façades, a rare find—and the proposed rear expansion will result in a significant loss of historic fabric and disrupt the rhythm of both facades. This row of four houses has an unusual rear façade pattern, including undulating half bays and a uniform fenestration pattern, not typically found on townhouses in this neighborhood and a feature worth preserving. Collectively, the rear yard and rooftop accretions demand too much from this diminutive house.

LPC determination: No Action

 

Category: Brooklyn, Brooklyn Heights, Douglaston, Greenwich Village, HDC@LPC, Historic District, individual landmark, Ladies’ Mile Historic District, Manhattan, New Construction, NoHo, Upper East Side, Upper West Side, Williamsburg · Tags:

The Historic Districts Council Analysis of The Real Estates Board of New York’s ‘Housing Production on NYC Landmark Properties’ Study

Posted by on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

  HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

June 2014 Volume 11, Number 5

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The Historic Districts Council Analysis of

The Real Estates Board of New York’s

‘Housing Production on NYC Landmark Properties’ Study

7-1-2014-REBNY afforadable housing study

The Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) is at it again! To welcome new LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan on her first day, the trade association and lobbying group released yet another study claiming that landmark designation inhibits the development of affordable housing and is at odds with the de Blasio’s administration’s goals of preserving and creating 200,000 units of affordable housing over the next ten years. REBNY’s complaints are nothing new, they are based on the group’s long-held and often-repeated premise that building on a landmarked site is so expensive and arduous that no one would ever want to do it.

Using a selective comprehension of statistics, the study shows that the percentage of affordable housing created on landmarked property from 2003-2012 was much lower than on non-designated property. Given that the percentage of affordable housing developed over that period was only 16.94% of the total property development in New York City, their argument begins to look a little skewed. The crisis in affordable housing which has finally captured the public’s attention is not a landmarking issue; this is a deeper indictment of the real estate market to provide for the needs of New Yorkers and the subtle failure of government to guide market forces to help meet that need.

 According to the REBNY study, only 3.64% of New York City is landmarked but “‘an astonishingly high 27.71%’ [of Manhattan is] designated”. This is neither astonishing nor remarkable. Despite concentrated efforts by the Landmarks Preservation Commission during the Bloomberg administration, boroughs outside of Manhattan remain under-represented among the designated historic districts due to a number of understandable but unfortunate historical reasons. We have every reason to believe that under the new administration, designation activity throughout the city will continue based on merit and community participation and this inequity will continue to be addressed. Finally, New York City’s affordable housing crisis is more pronounced in its outer boroughs, where there has been minimal designation by LPC. The focus on the lack of affordable housing in Manhattan due to district designation trivializes a very complex and serious issue.

Something that the REBNY report states but their press release does not trumpet is that during the 2003-2012 time period in question, 412 affordable housing units were created on landmark properties through renovation. Compare that to the 1,318 units constructed on landmark properties during the same period, and the numbers start looking different.

The Landmarks Commission itself answered these same charges when they were leveled by REBNY in September 2013 in an earlier previous report they issued on why they felt landmark designation was bad for New York. The LPC said:

[The report] fails to recognize the obvious: the purpose of the landmarking law is not to facilitate new construction; it is to preserve historic buildings and neighborhoods.  So the finding that new affordable housing construction in landmarked buildings and districts has been limited is hardly a surprise.  More interesting to your readers – and to those who  are genuinely interested in affordable housing – is that more than 1,100 units of affordable housing have been created or preserved in historic districts citywide since 2004, and [recently] an affordable development was proposed in the Gramercy Historic District.  The Bloomberg Administration has built and preserved more affordable housing units than any other city in the country – enough to house the entire city of Atlanta – and we have done it without sacrificing the historical character of the city, which adds both financial and civic value to neighborhoods. Affordable housing and historic preservation can go hand-in-hand.

To which we can only add, the only reason which we think that landmark designation might add to the housing crisis is that by preserving the architectural integrity of a beautiful historic city, lots of people want live here.

To read REBNY’s whole study click here

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 ’The Historic Districts Council says the city’s historic districts are not to blame for the shortage of affordable housing’

New York Daily News

By Jeffrey Kroessler

“If REBNY claims that historic districts truly stifle the construction of affordable housing, we should ask just how many affordable units are being built outside those protected districts. The answer is “not many.”

And before we blame the landmarks law as the impediment, is there actually an instance when the Landmarks Preservation Commission has denied such an application? The answer is no.

Many more people want to live in historic districts than are able to given the existing housing stock, but does that result in higher rents? Are rents in historic districts really higher than rents just outside the district, or 10 blocks away? In actuality there is very little difference, especially in the older buildings and, of course, rents are rising everywhere. Landmark designation is not the variable.”

To read the full article here 

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‘HDC Defends NYC Landmark Preservation’

City Land

Commentary by HDC Executive Director Simeon Bankoff

In truth, despite almost 50 years of the Landmarks Law, less than 4 percent of New York City’s properties are protected by landmark designation.  Statistics and numbers can be manipulated endlessly and yes, within a historic district, it’s true that you are surrounded by landmark buildings. But look at a map of the city or even only of Manhattan and it’s surprising how little is actually designated. Of those few areas, though, the effects are remarkable. Brooklyn Heights, Greenwich Village,  Fort Greene, the Upper West Side, Tribeca,  Dumbo – the list of neighborhoods which have improved in terms of services, housing and value since becoming historic districts goes on and on.  Even areas outside of the City’s core such as Jackson Heights, Ditmas Park and Saint George have seen remarkable prosperity since designation.

To read the full article here

Category: Affordable Housing, Blog, E-bulletin · Tags: , , , ,

It’s a Summer of Tours, Libations and Literature !!

Posted by on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 · Leave a Comment 

   E-BULLETIN OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS COUNCIL

June 2014, Volume 11, Number 4

 

STC_Logo_Web

Six to Celebrate Tours

From Yiddish to Chinese and Beyond: A Walking Tour of Historic Libraries in Chinatown

Thursday, July 10, 6:00PM (WALKING TOUR)

Seward Park Branch, exterior, west façade, 2010 (HDC)

Seward Park Branch, exterior, west façade, 2010 (HDC)

Visit two of the busiest Carnegie libraries in the New York Public Library system as well as other sites of interest between and near them, including one of the oldest graveyards in New York, Al Smith’s childhood home, and Knickerbocker Village, a forerunner of later urban renewal projects. The tour, led by John Bacon, HDC board member and Director of Planned Giving at The New York Public Library, will start at the McKim, Mead and White-designed Chatham Square Library and conclude at the Seward Park Library, which became a New York City landmark in 2013.

To learn more about this and other Six to Celebrate tours click here

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 Historic Pub Crawl

Pub Crawl-2

Join the Historic Districts Council and Chrysalis Archeological Consultants for a taste of the architecture, history and beverages of some of New York City’s oldest watering holes. The tour will begin with a tasting of Chrysalis bitters, brewed from an historic recipe and inspired by a 19th century bottle recently found at a Bowery archeological site, which promised to be an “Elixir of Long Life.” With that fortification , we will move on to the saw dust floors, neon signs and dumb waiters of 3 well-known and long-loved neighborhood establishments whose long lives have seen their share of social and architectural history. The tour will end with bar snacks and conversation. Really what more can you ask for…

Saturday, July 19, 2014

1:00 PM

$10

* Cost includes tasting of Chrysalis bitters and noshes at Old Town bar; beverages available for purchase.

To Purchase Tickets Click Here

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North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City

An Illustrated Book Talk

N-Brother Island

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Doors open at 6:00/Talk starts at 7:00

The Paris Cafe, 119 South Street (at Peck Slip)

Join us for a visual exploration of the one place most New Yorkers will never get to explore on their own.Photographer Christopher Payne will present a book talk on his recently published North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City 

In 1902 famed social commentator Jacob Riis, writing about North Brother Island, which then housed the Riverside Hospital said, “Today, where once was a waste of sand, are broad and shaded lawns; winding, well-kept walks, trees, shrubs and flowers; handsome, substantial buildings and hospital pavilions or ward.” Later in his article observing the differences in smallpox hospitals in Europe compared to this institution on North Brother Island, he noted that the “isolation secured in New York is absolute.” And though the island, 20 acres stranded in the middle of the East River, would see decades of activity both positive and tragic, this absolute isolation, even with vast transportation advancements citywide, would be the reason why the island was abandoned to nature by the middle of the 20th century.

Photographer Christopher Payne was granted permission by the city to photograph the island and its ruined structures, and the result is North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City. The book tells the story of the island; its thriving years, its connection to a number of infamous events and people, and recent decades when vegetation has consumed the now crumbling buildings. The book includes photography by Mr. Payne, a history of the island by University of Pennsylvania professor and preservationist Randall Mason, and an essay by author Robert Sullivan.

Program is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

To register, please call 212-614-9107 or email bharmon@hdc.org.

*Food and drinks will be available for purchase

The Paris Café, first opened in 1873, was frequented by such personages as Thomas Edison and Theodore Roosevelt, and nearly closed after sustaining damage from Superstorm Sandy.

This program is being co-sponsored by Fordham University Press

FUP

Category: Blog, E-bulletin · Tags:

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