Introducing Our Infographic!

Learn how historic preservation creates jobs, drives tourism, and supports local economies across NYC.
HDC-Infographic-slideshow-1

Preserving historic buildings and neighborhoods is good for New York City.

Most New Yorkers believe this to be true in their hearts, but it is sometimes helpful to have the facts to back it up. In response, the Historic Districts Council created a series of infographics entitled “How Historic Preservation Benefits New York City.”

The graphics have a simple message: as part of New York City’s multi-billion dollar tourism trade, a generator of good jobs and an attractive option for affordable housing, landmark buildings and historic districts are a positive force for the financial well-being of the city.

Based on the expansive 2014 report “A Proven Success: How the New York City Landmarks Law and Process Benefit the City, the infographics consolidate critical facts and figures to demonstrate the value of historic preservation in our city.

We invite you to review the infographics below, and encourage you to take the #PreservationPays challenge to spread the word — and be entered to win a trip to the Woolworth Tower Residences!

 

  • Preservation Does Not Make Housing Unaffordable

Preserving buildings and providing affordable housing are not mutually exclusive. Landmark designation does not dictate the use of a building and certainly does not impede redevelopment of a property into affordable housing. Furthermore, there has been no provable correlation to suggest that rent increases are a result of landmark designation.

 

  • Preservation Is Good For Tourism

New York’s remarkable historic buildings are a unique attraction. Upwards of 54 million tourists visited New York City in 2013, spending more than $38 million dollars in the process. Tourists are drawn to our city for its rich culture, distinctive built environment, and historic shopping districts.

 

  • Preservation Creates Jobs

Maintaining New York’s distinct sense of place is a full time job for many New Yorkers. Construction on historic buildings results in more and better paying jobs than new construction and secures federal tax credit dollars. Historic hotels, museums, restaurants, and parks are a staple in New York City and maintain thousands of good-paying jobs.

 

 

We encourage you to use the infographic to help familiarize yourself with the facts, spread the word, join the effort, and enjoy your city!

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Comments

3 Responses to “Introducing Our Infographic!”
  1. Amy Likover says:

    This HDC is inspiring our group, and we’re 3000 miles away!

    Thanks so much,

    Amy

  2. Terry Brennan says:

    Please keep up your efforts and please inform Mayor deBlasio that the best way to preserve affordable housing is to preserve neighborhoods in New York. The confused mayor has become a willful dupe of the real estate industry. They’ve convinced him, for whatever reason, that the best way to create affordable housing is to tear down middle class apartment houses and tenements and force the residents to move out of their neighborhoods. Then the real estate industry can replace those homes with massive luxury condominiums. A smattering of affordable housing just might be included, but New Yorkers certainly can’t count on it. Where did this mayor come from?

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The Historic Districts Council (HDC) is the advocate for all of New York City's historic neighborhoods. HDC is the only organization in New York that works directly with people who care about our city's historic neighborhoods and buildings. We represent a constituency of over 500 local community organizations.

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