St. John's Church and New Construction in Historic Districts Today A lecture by Stephen F. Byrns

Title: St. John’s Church and New Construction in Historic Districts Today A lecture by Stephen F. Byrns
Location: Neighborhood Preservation Center 232 East 11th Street
Description: St. John’s Getty Square was originally a 1751 Georgian manorial church in downtown Yonkers. In 1871, it became one of the first examples of historic preservation in America, with a magnificent enlargement by William Appleton Potter. It is also one of the first instances of the Colonial Revival in the nation. Byrns will draw upon his experience as an LPC Commissioner by discussing various recent examples of projects approved or disapproved by the LPC, and compare them to the changes at St. John’s over a period of 120 years.

Stephen F. Byrns is a partner at BKSK Architects and was a Commissioner at the Landmark Commission from 2004-10. He majored in History at Princeton University, where he wrote his thesis on William Butterfield.

Start Time: 18:00
Date: 2012-05-30
End Time: 20:00

 

to RSVP please email Ashley Shedd at ashedd@hdc.org 

Posted Under: Newsfeed, The Politics of Preservation

2 comments

  1. I highly recommend Mr. Byrns’s lecture which I have had the pleasure to enjoy at first hand after attending Mass with Steve at St. John’s one Sunday last fall.

    It is a fascinating story and important for all of us who struggle to better understand what is an appropriate new addition, in-fill or alteration to an historic property.

    I also recommend a trip to the church itself where you can see on the church’s grounds, among so many things, an historic public iced water fountain–a first in my experience!

    Episcopalians or others who keep the faith (or perhaps especially those who do not!) should go to see not only the church but also to hear Fr. John Hamilton, whose talent as a preacher would seem to be especially underutilized here at this small parish.

  2. I highly recommend Mr. Byrns’s lecture which I have had the pleasure to enjoy at first hand after attending Mass with Steve at St. John’s one Sunday last fall.

    It is a fascinating story and important for all of us who struggle to better understand what is an appropriate new addition, in-fill or alteration to an historic property.

    I also recommend a trip to the church itself where you can see on the church’s grounds, among so many things, an historic public iced water fountain–a first in my experience!

    Episcopalians or others who keep the faith (or perhaps especially those who do not!) should go to see not only the church but also to hear Fr. John Hamilton, whose talent as a preacher would seem to be especially underutilized here at this small parish.

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